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Early in my medical training, I developed an appreciation for the positive impact of pediatric palliative care on the lives of families and patients.  Palliative care is an approach to medical care that focuses on improving the patient’s quality of › Continue Reading

We’ve all read about the rare stories in the news where a teen collapses on a court or field from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). As parents, they shake us to our very core. For cardiologists like me, they haunt us. › Continue Reading

Recently the FDA approved a cancer treatment for kids and young adults that has been successful in clinical trials. It’s called CAR T-cell therapy, or chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy. I like to call it the Pac-Man for acute lymphocytic › Continue Reading

If you have school-age kids, it’s likely that they have mentioned, made, or mashed homemade slime at some point in the past several months. The craze is real: Kids all over the U.S. are enjoying making slime at home. The › Continue Reading

Typically, ADHD is diagnosed during the school years, particularly around age 7. But it is possible to diagnose it as early as four years old. However, it is a difficult diagnosis to make at this young age. All preschoolers, by › Continue Reading

As a social worker in the Cincinnati Fetal Center, I help families process and move through a serious diagnosis that they have received for their baby. Receiving news that your child is sick is heartbreaking. Families often feel like they’ve › Continue Reading

Fall is here, and kids all over the Midwest know what that means: It’s time to jump in big piles of leaves! But that might not be such a good idea for kiddos who suffer from environmental allergies. Let’s Talk › Continue Reading

The Graham-Cassidy bill – introduced in Congress earlier this month – will likely be put to a vote in the Senate before the end of this week. We don’t yet know the full impact of this legislation because the Congressional › Continue Reading

Are there more sniffles and sneezes around your house than usual? With this season often come the runny noses and itchy eyes that fall allergies bring. If you have a child with seasonal allergies, here’s what you need to know › Continue Reading

As a parent of three teenagers, I worry about a lot of things. At the top of that list are the challenges they face as they begin making their own decisions. Adolescents and young adults have a tremendous amount of › Continue Reading

As a dietitian in the Center for Better Health and Nutrition, parents often tell me that they spend a lot of time packing their kids’ lunches, only to find the majority of it coming back home. This situation can be › Continue Reading

The scientific world has been looking for the causes of preterm birth for decades. Yet it has remained one of the great mysteries of human biology. We know that preterm birth is a combination of both genetic and environmental factors, › Continue Reading

This September marks my daughter’s, Gretchen’s, 20-year work anniversary at Cincinnati Children’s. It’s an exciting milestone for anyone, but it’s particularly remarkable for her. That’s because she has Down syndrome and 20 years ago it was not very common for › Continue Reading

As a pediatric orthopedic surgeon, I feel compelled to write a public service announcement (PSA) for lawn mower safety. Here’s why: I will never forget the first time I saw the consequences of a child’s injury from a lawn mowing accident. › Continue Reading

There is much excitement around the total solar eclipse taking place on August 21, 2017. Understandably so – it only happens around every 18 months and is an unbelievable sight. Even if you aren’t in the “path of totality” much › Continue Reading

Kids will be heading back to school before we know it! Whether your child is excited about the new year or dreading it, this period of time is always an adjustment. So how can parents help their children get mentally prepared › Continue Reading

This is the time of year when parents worry about keeping their kids hydrated and preventing them from getting over-heated.  And water is typically all it takes – fancy sports drinks aren’t needed unless your kid is a star athlete. › Continue Reading

Unless you live in a region of the United States that’s known for venomous snakes, you probably don’t spend a lot of time thinking about snake bites. But knowing how to prevent them and what to do if bitten are › Continue Reading

Our mighty daughter entered into this world on Christmas Day. Except, she was three months early. Doctors determined that for her safety, it was for the best. She measured 12 inches and weighed only one pound. What an UN-expected gift! › Continue Reading

Kids are not little adults, but they certainly experience many of the same emotions that we do. Anger is something that everyone endures – from “typical” kids to kids who have other health diagnoses like depression, anxiety, or ADHD.  And › Continue Reading

It is that time of year when high school juniors are starting to think about college visits and life after high school. The college search can be stressful, and having an eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorder (EGID) can add an extra layer › Continue Reading

Is my child’s language development normal? It’s one of the most frequently asked questions we receive in speech-language pathology. While every child is different and develops in his or her own way, there are “typical” paths that most babies on › Continue Reading

Every big medical discovery starts with a big question.  And asking those big questions is part of the Cincinnati Children’s culture. Can we help the brain protect itself from injury in sports? Can we partner in communities and schools to › Continue Reading

Doing piles of laundry and managing the logistics of getting your child to games and practices comes with the territory for any athlete’s parent. But there’s something else nobody told you about when your kid signed up to play sports: › Continue Reading

When a child first receives a cancer diagnosis, the news impacts the entire family. Everyone processes this differently, but typical reactions can include fear, shock, disbelief, guilt, confusion, anger, and sadness. Our team in the Patient and Family Wellness Center › Continue Reading