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The holidays mean something a little bit different for everyone. For me, it’s the time of year in which I step up my button battery awareness efforts into high gear. My youngest son, Emmett, swallowed a button battery seven years › Continue Reading

Holiday planning can be challenging for anyone, but for friends and family members of kids with food allergies, it can be especially difficult.  So I reached out to my colleagues in our allergy clinic and the Cincinnati Center for Eosinophilic Disorders to › Continue Reading

My husband and I always knew we wanted to adopt. We affirmed this desire when we saw the need through our worldwide travels with the Navy. When we were on active duty, we visited Ugandan orphanages. Our hearts were opened › Continue Reading

We had never heard of pulmonary hypertension until December 2014. Now we know that it happens when the blood flow that leaves the right side of the heart faces an increased resistance, increasing pressure on that side of the heart.  › Continue Reading

The holiday season is officially upon us and with it comes a great opportunity to focus on being thankful. Many children look forward to this time of year with excitement and wonder. Many also have big expectations and sometimes not › Continue Reading

Our son, Henry, is a patient in the Heart Institute. He has tetralogy of Fallot and had open heart surgery on November 17, 2015. He had this procedure when he was five months old to correct some of the defects caused by his condition. We have pursued › Continue Reading

Pregnancy can be stressful – there’s a lot to think about and even avoid during those nine months. Taking the right supplements. Avoiding certain types of fish and raw foods. Steering clear of some medications. Controlling blood sugar. The list › Continue Reading

We adopted Shana from China when she was seven. She had lived in an orphanage for special needs children her whole life. It was pretty obvious that she had never learned to run and play. She did not laugh. They › Continue Reading

Kawasaki disease is one of those conditions that many people haven’t heard of, until one of their loved ones is affected. While it is rare, it is important to be aware of because it can be easily misdiagnosed as other › Continue Reading

Have you heard the term walking pneumonia and wondered, What in the world? Walking pneumonia is a common illness in children. You may also hear your doctor refer to it as atypical pneumonia. It is an infection of the lungs, › Continue Reading

I was diagnosed with congenital hip dysplasia immediately after birth. My clicky hips were treated with the 1980s version of the Pavlik harness, triple cloth diapers.  As a child, I was a masterful toe-walker and contortionist that enjoyed w-sitting, doing › Continue Reading

I am a sentimental human.  Every so often, I’ll pull out these photo albums that my mom lovingly put together for me growing up.  They start with a baby girl with big brown eyes exploring her new world. Eventually, she › Continue Reading

Have you ever wondered how it is possible that you can solve problems around the house, achieve goals at work, or finish a challenging task? This is due to something called executive function (EF). EF is a group of thinking › Continue Reading

My daughter, Kate, has Down syndrome. We found out hours after she was born, hours after we thought she was not going to survive, because she could not breathe on her own. Today she is a toddler and thriving. She › Continue Reading

Research has shown that about half of all families of kids who take daily medication have a hard time remembering to take their medication at least some of the time. Medication adherence, or the extent to which patients’ behaviors match › Continue Reading

Early in my medical training, I developed an appreciation for the positive impact of pediatric palliative care on the lives of families and patients.  Palliative care is an approach to medical care that focuses on improving the patient’s quality of › Continue Reading

We’ve all read about the rare stories in the news where a teen collapses on a court or field from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). As parents, they shake us to our very core. For cardiologists like me, they haunt us. › Continue Reading

Recently the FDA approved a cancer treatment for kids and young adults that has been successful in clinical trials. It’s called CAR T-cell therapy, or chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy. I like to call it the Pac-Man for acute lymphocytic › Continue Reading

If you have school-age kids, it’s likely that they have mentioned, made, or mashed homemade slime at some point in the past several months. The craze is real: Kids all over the U.S. are enjoying making slime at home. The › Continue Reading

Typically, ADHD is diagnosed during the school years, particularly around age 7. But it is possible to diagnose it as early as four years old. However, it is a difficult diagnosis to make at this young age. All preschoolers, by › Continue Reading

As a social worker in the Cincinnati Fetal Center, I help families process and move through a serious diagnosis that they have received for their baby. Receiving news that your child is sick is heartbreaking. Families often feel like they’ve › Continue Reading

Fall is here, and kids all over the Midwest know what that means: It’s time to jump in big piles of leaves! But that might not be such a good idea for kiddos who suffer from environmental allergies. Let’s Talk › Continue Reading

The Graham-Cassidy bill – introduced in Congress earlier this month – will likely be put to a vote in the Senate before the end of this week. We don’t yet know the full impact of this legislation because the Congressional › Continue Reading

Are there more sniffles and sneezes around your house than usual? With this season often come the runny noses and itchy eyes that fall allergies bring. If you have a child with seasonal allergies, here’s what you need to know › Continue Reading

As a parent of three teenagers, I worry about a lot of things. At the top of that list are the challenges they face as they begin making their own decisions. Adolescents and young adults have a tremendous amount of › Continue Reading