Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an imaging method that uses the protons of hydrogen atoms within the body to generate a medical image. MRI of the lungs has historically been challenging for a few different reasons. One reason is that › Continue Reading

“Partners in Patient Experience” Photos: Winners of the Patient Experience Awards: Randi Kugel (holding yellow flowers) and Julie Young (holding red flowers). In continuing our celebration of Patient Experience Week in our Radiology Department, we held a western-themed party last Tuesday during › Continue Reading

Patient experience week (April 24-28) is an annual event initially started by the Beryl Institute (a global community of practice dedicated to improving the patient experience through collaboration and shared knowledge). During this week, hospitals across the nation take some › Continue Reading

Imagine yourself as a young kid again. Your parents tell you that you’re going to the doctor for a check up. Your mind starts to create scenarios of what may happen at the doctor’s office. The fear of the unknown › Continue Reading

Today is Banana Day!

It’s an edible fruit, a berry (botanically), and its name is thought to be of West African origin. What is it? A banana! Three small bananas can provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. Like apples and watermelons, bananas can › Continue Reading

Prematurely born babies often have difficulty breathing on their own because their lungs have not fully developed before birth. Some of these babies require long durations of oxygen support or mechanical ventilation and are given a clinical diagnosis of bronchopulmonary › Continue Reading

Most people have no idea what our imaging analysts’ duties consist of in the Post-Processing and Image Analysis Lab. The job is actually pretty elaborate! It’s time to take you on a little behind-the-scenes tour of what really happens. Image: “Sagittal › Continue Reading

Odontogenesis, or the formation of teeth, is a complex multistep process requiring interaction between different cell types. This begins at approximately four weeks into utero life. Eventually, most babies will develop two sets of teeth. Twenty baby teeth grow in › Continue Reading

Today is World Health Day! The World Health Organization’s goal is “to build a better, healthier future for people all over the world.” Environmental research is crucial in making a healthier future for our children. One of our faculty members, › Continue Reading

It’s no secret that when an x-ray image is taken of the human body, the body is exposed to a small dose of radiation. This is necessary in order for the radiologist to determine a patient’s medical problem. Be assured › Continue Reading

The Jean Turner Minority Scholarship for Medical Imaging Technology Administered by Cincinnati Children’s – Radiology Department Photo: (lf-rt), Dr. Brian Coley, Jean Turner, Nakiijah Sanders, Becci Pryor (BS CRA RT(R)), and Susan Smith (radiology manager). As a young African-American woman, › Continue Reading

Question: “Why did the toilet paper roll down the hill?” “I don’t know…why?” Answer: “To get to the bottom.” For many kids, this kind of bathroom humor is shared on the playground with friends or told to groans of laughter › Continue Reading

We recently caught up with Dr. Andrew T. Trout, one of our radiologists. Watch the video interview below to learn why he loves working at Cincinnati Children’s, why he choose Radiology and what he does at home with his kids.

Have you ever wondered why it’s so dark in an ultrasound scan room? Many patients question why we turn the lights down when they come in for a scan. The answer is simple: so we can see better! The retina › Continue Reading

Hi, my name is Chelsea Franklin and I work in the Radiography/Fluoroscopy Division of our Radiology Department. I married my high school sweetheart and we have two lovely children together, a boy named Tanner who is 6 and a little girl › Continue Reading

Photo: Joanne Dalton, in the middle of anesthesia nurses group, wearing a tiara. Cincinnati Children’s is saying goodbye to two of own, who are moving on to pursue other career opportunities. Joanne Dalton has held several positions during her tenure with us. She › Continue Reading

He holds the titles of Associate Professor of Radiology; Assistant Professor of Pediatrics; Associate Chief, Clinical Operations and Radiology Informatics; Neil D. Johnson Chair of Radiology Informatics – got all that? You must be wondering who on earth that could be. › Continue Reading

When he was younger, my older brother had a small plastic gun that shot shiny round BB pellets. One day he told my mom that a bunch of his BB’s were missing. Sure enough, the case of the missing BB › Continue Reading

Sarhea is my 9-year-old daughter. She has cystic fibrosis and occasionally has to get different studies done in our Department of Radiology. The most recent was an MRI exam used to look at her liver. She wanted to write a › Continue Reading

The pancreas has two major jobs: one is to produce insulin, which helps control blood sugar, while the other is to produce fluid that helps digest food. Diseases that affect the pancreas can disrupt one or both of these functions. › Continue Reading

In early November of 2016, Steve Kraus, MD, the Division Chief of Fluoroscopy, traveled with two surgeons, an anesthesiologist, a nurse anesthetist, two operating room scrub nurses, a circulating nurse, and three floor nurses from Cincinnati Children’s Colorectal Center on a surgical mission trip to › Continue Reading

When a girl is born with an anorectal malformation, she can sometimes have anomalies of her vagina, uterus, ovaries, kidneys or bladder. We’ll be focusing on vaginal anomalies, including imperforate hymen, partial agenesis of the vagina and complete agenesis of the › Continue Reading

Kayla Beck is a new addition to the Reading Room assistants in our Radiology Department. She completed her Health Unit Coordinator (HUC) Certification in 2015 and is working on continuing her education in the medical field. Kayla has wanted to work for › Continue Reading

March Fractures

Featured Image: T2 image lateral view shows the bright signal and dark fracture line stress fracture (arrow) With spring and warmer weather right around the corner, sports seasons change and children’s physical activity levels may increase. Bones constantly repair and › Continue Reading

“Why does my child need an MRI in addition to his PET/CT?” “Why does my child need a CT in addition to her PET/CT?” These are questions we are asked frequently by caregivers and patients who are being imaged after a diagnosis › Continue Reading