Research

September is an exciting month in the Department of Radiology’s Division of Thoracoabdominal Imaging here at Cincinnati Children’s. The second Pediatric Body MRI Course presented by The Society for Pediatric Radiology is coming to town and will be held in › Continue Reading

Photo: (lf-rt) Keagan Gertz, Nathaniel Roberson, Andrew Furthmiller and Alexandra Plemmons. Once again this summer, four University of Cincinnati College of Medicine second-year medical students are at work on several clinical radiology research projects. In this nine-week program, our medical students › Continue Reading

Some babies who are born prematurely require long durations of respiratory support due to underdeveloped lungs and are given a clinical diagnosis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Over the past 20 years, research has fueled improvement in the clinical care and › Continue Reading

The Cincinnati Children’s Radiology Department’s Informatics Team manages the computers and electronic systems necessary for the storage and interpretation of your child’s medical images. Each year the team participates in the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual conference. This year’s › Continue Reading

Hybrid Imaging

What is hybrid imaging and why do some Nuclear Medicine scanners have a CT scanner built-in? Since 2006, some of the Nuclear Medicine scanners at Cincinnati Children’s have a built in CT portion to the scanner. For many imaging studies, › Continue Reading

Photo: http://www.kitchensisters.org/hidden-kitchens/dissident-kitchens/, ©Ksenia Vytulev Who would have guessed that music and radiology could cross paths? Well, in the 1950’s Soviet Union they became intricately linked. Post World War II, censorship in the Soviet Union was extensive and obtaining forbidden music was › Continue Reading

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to evaluate the progression of lung disease in pediatric patients. Premature infants, for example, very often experience pulmonary complications and could greatly benefit from several imaging check-ups over time. Computed tomography (CT) is › Continue Reading

Congratulations are in order for Lindsey Hekler, one of our ultrasound technologists, and Dr. Brian Coley, radiologist in chief at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. They were two of the authors on “Pediatric Sonography Curriculum: A Matter of Patient Safety,” which was published in the › Continue Reading

SPR (Society for Pediatric Radiology) is a professional membership association for pediatric radiologists and technologists. Members of SPR hold a conference every year where pediatric imaging professionals gather to share and discuss their research, clinical projects and latest accomplishments in › Continue Reading

As you may or may not know, technologists working in Radiology have an obligation to keep up with their continuing education throughout their entire careers. Much like with registered nurses, this is to prove we maintain performing at the same › Continue Reading

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an imaging method that uses the protons of hydrogen atoms within the body to generate a medical image. MRI of the lungs has historically been challenging for a few different reasons. One reason is that › Continue Reading

Prematurely born babies often have difficulty breathing on their own because their lungs have not fully developed before birth. Some of these babies require long durations of oxygen support or mechanical ventilation and are given a clinical diagnosis of bronchopulmonary › Continue Reading

Today is World Health Day! The World Health Organization’s goal is “to build a better, healthier future for people all over the world.” Environmental research is crucial in making a healthier future for our children. One of our faculty members, › Continue Reading

The pancreas has two major jobs: one is to produce insulin, which helps control blood sugar, while the other is to produce fluid that helps digest food. Diseases that affect the pancreas can disrupt one or both of these functions. › Continue Reading

The Pediatric Cerebrovascular Center (PCC) at Cincinnati Children’s is one of the only comprehensive, multidisciplinary centers in North America that provides advanced subspeciality care to children with cerebrovascular and spinal vascular diseases. Our center is truly distinguished in that every › Continue Reading

Have you ever wondered how radiologists stay up to date on the newest imaging techniques to help diagnose your child’s problem? As noted in recent blogs, radiologists at Cincinnati Children’s not only interpret your child’s images and treat some conditions, › Continue Reading

Our families and homes are made safer from household fires with the use of flame-retardant chemicals in our clothing, furniture, carpeting, electronics, and home’s insulation. However, there is now evidence that certain types of flame-retardant chemicals can interfere with childhood › Continue Reading

Our investment and commitment to advancing medicine occurs on a daily basis here at Cincinnati Children’s. Clinical data collection, process improvement plans, training modules, etc. are products of medical innovations that come about in our Radiology-Translational Research and Simulation Lab. › Continue Reading

Why are MRI scans so loud? To answer this question, we must first review a few basic facts you may or may not know about MRI. For starters, your typical MRI is something called a superconducting magnet and it is › Continue Reading

Here is an interesting thought to ponder. What is your brain doing when you are not doing anything or performing a mindless task, like when you let your mind wander while listening to a monotonous lecture or are sitting in traffic? › Continue Reading

Here at Cincinnati Children’s, we have around six MR scanners in our Radiology department. Have you ever wondered what’s inside of an MRI scanner and why it makes those weird noises? Well, did you know that liquid helium is one of › Continue Reading

Here at Cincinnati Children’s, the Department of Radiology is involved in an international multicenter research collaboration focused on the etiology and optimal management of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). OCD is often painful and could potentially be a permanently disabling condition that › Continue Reading

Sports-related traumatic brain injury (sTBI) is a significant public health problem, yet current medical consensus offers limited solutions to prevent brain injury from sports-related head impacts. One explanation for this lack of progress could be that all attempts to protect the › Continue Reading

As you may know, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) allows exquisite imaging of the brain. Advanced Neuroimaging refers to recent techniques that image beyond the anatomy of the human brain. Our Radiology Department uses some of these techniques on a regular basis › Continue Reading

The big “c” word, also known as cancer, has affected each and every one of us. Whether we have fought the battle ourselves, or have stood by family or friends while they faced it head on, we can all agree › Continue Reading