Research

Every year in the United States there are approximately 1,750 spinal cord injuries in children and teens younger than 18 years of age. Here at Cincinnati Children’s, my colleagues and I are interested in discovering early imaging signs of traumatic injuries › Continue Reading

Every year right after Thanksgiving, radiologists from all over the United States and the world gather in Chicago for the Radiologic Society of North America (RSNA) annual conference and meeting. The RSNA is an exciting opportunity for us at Cincinnati › Continue Reading

Your child is more sensitive to the effects of radiation than you are. That’s why at Cincinnati Children’s, we make every effort to reduce the amount of radiation your child receives during his or her imaging study. We use state-of-the-art equipment and › Continue Reading

Dr. Jason Woods’ research focuses on novel ways of imaging lung structure and function with techniques that don’t require sedation, anesthesia, or radiation. The two most promising techniques both use MRI—a modality that uses radio frequencies that are lower in energy › Continue Reading

Physicians are lifelong learners, seeking out new research and ways to improve the care they provide to patients and families. Our radiologists at Cincinnati Children’s are committed to their ongoing education. They attend regional, national and even international conferences and › Continue Reading

Most of us have been to a radiology department for an x-ray, ultrasound or even a CT or MRI. This kind of imaging provides a better look at what’s happening inside our bodies, whether it’s a simple broken bone, an › Continue Reading

The new research building at Cincinnati Children’s has plenty to offer, not the least of which is an impressive collection of artwork and architectural features. One of the most visible pieces is the multi-colored sculpture entitled Color Field Sculpture by Shelley › Continue Reading

One of the hallmarks of Cincinnati Children’s is the huge role that research plays in our mission. It is not always obvious, but one way or the other, research impacts almost all of our activities. Researchers who study research (yes, › Continue Reading

Here at Cincinnati Children’s we perform ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on pregnant women every day. That is because Cincinnati Children’s Fetal Care Center is a large referral in the evaluation of babies in the womb who have been diagnosed › Continue Reading

Pediatric interventional radiology, a subspecialty of pediatric radiology, allows doctors to use image guidance (such as real-time x-rays called fluoroscopy, ultrasound, or CT -CAT scan guidance) to perform minimally invasive surgical procedures in children. These procedures can be done through small needles › Continue Reading

ACL Tear

Now that spring has finally arrived and everyone is coming out of hibernation, there are more opportunities for injuries.  One injury most people are familiar with is the anterior cruciate ligament or ACL tear.  The ACL is an important stabilizer › Continue Reading

While our #MummyScan is officially complete and the results have been shared, there remain some unanswered questions about the Peruvian child mummy on display at the Cincinnati Museum Center. Before this winter, not much was known about this 500-year-old mummy › Continue Reading

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a rare disorder present in males from birth. It is often transmitted by a genetic mutation, which is a change in the make-up of the gene, and slowly causes muscles to weaken. Symptoms can be › Continue Reading

Members of the Radiology and Medical Imaging Team at Cincinnati Children’s joined the staff of the Cincinnati Museum Center to perform a “virtual autopsy” on a child mummy more than 500 years old from the Peruvian desert. It’s the first › Continue Reading

The opportunity to partner with the Cincinnati Museum Center and to be part of history at Cincinnati Children’s last night was an honor and an exciting opportunity as our team of radiologists and technologists performed the virtual autopsy of a › Continue Reading

As part of a unique partnership with the Cincinnati Museum Center, the Radiology Department at Cincinnati Children’s helped shed some light (actually, x-rays in this case) on the life and death of a child mummy that is part of the Mummies of › Continue Reading

Gastroschisis is a birth defect of the abdominal (belly) wall where the baby’s intestines stick outside of the body through a hole near the belly button. The cause of this condition is unknown, although it affects approximately 1,871 babies born › Continue Reading

Our interventional radiology research and simulation lab, which opened in 2012, contains equipment identical to that in our clinical labs. The research lab not only allows interventional radiologists to develop and master new techniques that can be used to treat your child, but provides an excellent › Continue Reading

The babies in our neonatal unit are very delicate and require special care. Many are extra small in size due to prematurity, while others are sick and frail due to an underlying illness. These babies often receive important medications through intravenous › Continue Reading

Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is a potentially life-threatening illness that often has a long-term impact on the development and general health of infants. In infants with this birth defect, there is a hole in the diaphragm (the muscle that’s responsible › Continue Reading

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a skeletal muscular disorder that occurs almost exclusively in boys. In this disorder, affected children suffer from progressive muscle weakness. Boys suffering from DMD experience difficulty walking, eventually requiring them to use a wheelchair, and ultimately an early death in › Continue Reading

The holidays are a busy time of year for everyone, but they also happen to be an even busier time for radiologists. Every year during the week following Thanksgiving, the Radiologic Society of North America (RSNA) Annual Meeting is held › Continue Reading

“A 5-year-old with headache, vomiting, and double vision” are words that may prompt a doctor to order a brain MRI. Luckily, most brain MRI exams with this indication end up being normal; however, we sometimes unfortunately identify abnormalities that lead us › Continue Reading

How can you make breast imaging better? This is the question asked by a group of engineers, imaging scientists, and radiologists. The answer they found was amazing. Researchers in Cincinnati Children’s Imaging Research Center took on this challenging question last › Continue Reading

How can imaging change the outcome for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in children and young adults? This is the question that drives the work of the faculty and staff of the Imaging Research Center at Cincinnati Children’s. You › Continue Reading