Rare and Complex Conditions

Today we were reminded of how a group of thoughtful people can make a big impact in the lives of others. In this case, it was a group of middle school students from Seven Hills bringing a huge smile to two-year-old › Continue Reading

When your child is diagnosed with celiac disease, deciding what to eat can feel overwhelming! That's why we've put together a list of safe and unsafe ingredients for kids and parents to reference. The good news is that there are many gluten-free grains › Continue Reading
Because I was born with double outlet right ventricle, a type of congenital heart defect, along with additional heart conditions, I never thought that it would be possible for me to carry a child. In fact, for most of my › Continue Reading

This quote is appropriately displayed on our participants’ bib holders, which they will be able to frame after they finish the progressive Flying Pig Marathon: “The miracle isn’t that I finished. The miracle is that I had the courage to › Continue Reading

While inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be a very frustrating condition for many children – and some may wonder if the symptoms will ever end – there is much to be hopeful about. About 80% of our patients are truly › Continue Reading
Henry arrived after an easy pregnancy and smooth delivery. Soon after his birth one of his nurses casually mentioned that she heard a heart murmur. I convinced myself it was just a benign murmur, something that would fix itself or › Continue Reading

Bartter syndrome entered my life swiftly through my son, Ian Wesolowski. Less than eight months ago he was fighting to stay alive. His potassium, sodium and chloride levels were all extremely low and no one could explain why. Ian was › Continue Reading

I see many children and adolescents participate in our Bowel Management Program who have challenges that would stress out even the most patient adult. Some of these kids struggle with constipation. Others have bowel accidents that are totally unpredictable. What › Continue Reading

When your child receives a cancer or blood disease diagnosis, it can be a stressful period of time. A lot of information has been given to you and sorting through it all can be overwhelming. The good news is that › Continue Reading

Some parents might be surprised to learn that more and more children are being diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas. It occurs in about 1 in 10,000 kids of all ages, including infants and toddlers. › Continue Reading

Tracking seizures can be incredibly helpful for parents and caregivers alike to help figure out when they happen, whether there are any potential triggers, and whether there are any patterns to the seizures. This type of information can be helpful › Continue Reading

What we know about medications and how they affect the kidneys has evolved over the last decade. More awareness is needed around this new knowledge because what we’ve learned about nephrotoxic medications is that they can lead to poor outcomes – › Continue Reading

Today – March 6 – is a special day for us. It is our son Ryan’s birthday (see Part 1 of our story here). We’re excited to share the final part of this story today because it turns out this › Continue Reading

When our son Ryan was born with a congenital heart defect (CHD), the world as our family knew it was turned upside down. If you didn’t read that part of our story yesterday, please go read it here and then › Continue Reading

Our son Ryan has always been a heart warrior – that’s part of the deal when you’re diagnosed with a congenital heart defect (CHD) as a baby. But he and our family didn’t truly become heart advocates until a fateful visit › Continue Reading

One of the most common threads we hear from parents is the challenge of understanding and describing your child’s congenital heart disease to friends and family. That’s why we developed nine congenital heart disease animations for families to view and share. But › Continue Reading

Whether your child has received a diagnosis quickly or has traveled a long journey to eventually get one, receiving an eventual diagnosis can bring about a mixture of emotions. On one hand it can be relieving to know what it › Continue Reading

Laryngomalacia. That’s a big word to explain a relatively common condition that occurs in infants. “Laryngo” means having to do with the larynx (the “voicebox”), which is located in the trachea where the vocal cords are. And “malacia” means a › Continue Reading

Ten years ago, it was starting to become clear that my 12-year-old son was not well. At first I’d assumed his string of occasional fevers and complaints of stomach pain were just everyday viruses. However, I soon realized he was › Continue Reading

Lego fanatic! So many kids are these days, but my son James epitomizes the title. My daughter loves them, too, but he eats, sleeps, and breathes Legos. So of course “Art of the Brick” at Cincinnati Museum Center was top › Continue Reading

The short answer is: it depends. If you have congenital heart disease and are thinking about becoming pregnant, or if you already are pregnant, you need to speak with a high-risk obstetrician (maternal fetal medicine (MFM) specialist) and a cardiologist › Continue Reading

Holidays can be challenging for kids (and adults!) with food allergies. Many holiday foods are not safe for those with food allergies – especially allergies to milk, egg, and wheat. However, many traditional foods can be made with allergy-friendly ingredients › Continue Reading

We had our first baby- a boy- on a Friday evening in Spring of 2010. We were thrilled with how perfect he was, admiring every finger and toe, and gladly took him home after the required two-day stay in the › Continue Reading

Our dietitians put together holiday recipes that exclude six of the most common food allergens.  (Recipe courtesy of Raquel Durban). Ingredients 2 cups gluten free flour 3 frozen bananas 1 cup frozen berries 3/4 cup sugar 1/2 cup applesauce 2 › Continue Reading

Our dietitians put together holiday recipes that exclude the six most common food allergens. Recipe courtesy of Bethany Doerfler. Ingredients(serves 4) 1 can white kidney (cannelloni) beans 2-3 Tbsp olive oil 3-4 plum tomatoes (diced) ½ cup black or Kalamata › Continue Reading