Research and Discoveries

It is well known that secondhand smoke can cause serious health problems in children. Yet about 40% of them are still exposed to tobacco. We see evidence of this in our own Emergency Department (ED). About 22% of total visits › Continue Reading

When my daughter Sedona turned two years old she was little Miss Independent. She could button buttons and zip zippers. She knew how to get herself a snack. And she was even potty trained already. The thing that she could › Continue Reading

It’s been 10 years since the introduction of the HPV vaccine (human papillomavirus) in 2006. A lot has happened since then, including a new study confirming how highly effective the HPV vaccine is. Because of that, I thought it would be worthwhile to provide › Continue Reading

There is nothing worse than watching your child go through something excruciating and being unable to stop it. Sarhea’s Birth Story On a Tuesday morning, my daughter Sarhea (Suh-ray-uh) was born via emergency cesarean section due to her not responding during › Continue Reading

When you’re pregnant, keeping track of all of the things that are unsafe to eat can feel a little overwhelming. High levels of mercury in fish is one of those exposures that has been well documented as being detrimental to › Continue Reading

While inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be a very frustrating condition for many children – and some may wonder if the symptoms will ever end – there is much to be hopeful about. About 80% of our patients are truly › Continue Reading

What we know about medications and how they affect the kidneys has evolved over the last decade. More awareness is needed around this new knowledge because what we’ve learned about nephrotoxic medications is that they can lead to poor outcomes – › Continue Reading

Parents often ask me: “Should I let my kid play football?” Or hockey, or lacrosse, or soccer, or any other contact sport. Their biggest concern with these sports has to do with concussions, and rightfully so. The concussion topic has been › Continue Reading

Today marks the opening of the William K. Schubert Research Clinic, a one-stop shop for families participating in clinical trials at Cincinnati Children’s. The clinic is centrally located inside our new Clinical Sciences Pavilion (also known as Location T) and › Continue Reading

In Memory of Liam

The story of our son Liam’s life is the story no parent wants to tell, but we do and we tell it for a reason. We can never have Liam back, but his memory is helping us make something good › Continue Reading

Five more patients now have the technology they need to make their voices heard thanks, again, to the compassion and generosity of Joy and Scott Bennett. The Bennetts began funding assistive communication devices for children and adults in need shortly › Continue Reading

Today we are unveiling the new Clinical Sciences Pavilion (also known as Location T), a 445,000-square-foot research tower that sits between our clinical care area on main campus (Locations A-E) and our companion research tower that opened in 2008 (also known › Continue Reading

When Abby Blevins and Isela Leal were invited to collaborate on a piece of artwork that would be placed in Cincinnati Children’s new Clinical Sciences Pavilion, it was an opportunity they couldn’t pass up. The Clinical Sciences Pavilion, to be › Continue Reading

Asthma is a frustrating condition for patients, parents and doctors alike, for many different reasons. From my perspective, it’s frustrating because not all patients respond well to treatment; in fact, 40-70% of patients do not respond optimally to the treatments › Continue Reading

While our #MummyScan is officially complete and the results have been shared, there remain some unanswered questions about the Peruvian child mummy on display at the Cincinnati Museum Center. Before this winter, not much was known about this 500-year-old mummy › Continue Reading

The opportunity to partner with the Cincinnati Museum Center and to be part of history at Cincinnati Children’s last night was an honor and an exciting opportunity as our team of radiologists and technologists performed the virtual autopsy of a › Continue Reading

If your child is born with sickle cell in the United States, chances are good (95-99%) that he or she will survive to adulthood. That is not the case for a child born with sickle cell in Uganda or other › Continue Reading

Each year, 15 million babies worldwide are born too soon. In the United States, 1 in every 9 babies is born preterm. And in an average week in Ohio, 322 babies arrive early. On Ohio’s most recent March of Dime’s › Continue Reading

As both a pediatric surgeon and a researcher, I have dedicated my career to caring for and investigating potential therapies for patients with intestinal failure. Even though we have been studying the human intestine for decades, there is so much › Continue Reading

The Support We Needed

Earlier today the 2014 March for Babies employee campaign was launched at Cincinnati Children’s. I’m honored to be serving, with my husband and daughter, as the ambassador family for this year’s campaign. Our experience with the March of Dimes, and › Continue Reading

Whether it was his intent or not, Benjamin Scot did an amazing thing for prematurity awareness month when he began capturing footage of his premature infant son just days after his birth. You may have seen Benjamin’s video – “Ward › Continue Reading

Despite doing everything “right,” in my pregnancies, I delivered both of my girls prematurely. I avoided unhealthy environmental factors.  I went to prenatal appointments. I took my vitamins. Ate a well-balanced diet.  So why was my first daughter born almost › Continue Reading

To look into Jameson Golliday’s bright blue eyes or watch him dart around a room scattered with toys, one would never guess the one-year-old is part of a gene therapy clinical trial for the immune disease popularly known as “Bubble › Continue Reading

Our ability to savor the sounds of our world depends on the remarkable machinery of the inner ear, where highly sensitive hair cells convert sound waves into electric pulses that the brain translates into music, spoken language, the sounds of › Continue Reading

Much like cities and towns connected by highways and streets, the neurons in our brains are connected by nerve fibers called dendrites and axons. Neurons are supported by other neural cells called astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s are › Continue Reading