Posts From Tony Dandino

As 2015 comes to an end, we are inevitably bound to reflect on the past 12 months and really cherish all the hard work. In an effort to honor the hard work of 2015’s Cincinnati Children’s Radiology Blog team, here are › Continue Reading

Every year in the United States there are approximately 1,750 spinal cord injuries in children and teens younger than 18 years of age. Here at Cincinnati Children’s, my colleagues and I are interested in discovering early imaging signs of traumatic injuries › Continue Reading

No matter the department within Cincinnati Children’s, training our staff is a big part of being prepared for all situations– whether or not they are likely to happen. Oftentimes we run fire and safety drills within our departments, and few people › Continue Reading

The nights grow dark as the temperature drops, and the leaves begin releasing themselves from their seasonal attachments, all to create a colorful backdrop for the monsters and ghouls that are starting to infest our neighborhoods. Fall has finally arrived › Continue Reading

At Cincinnati Children’s, neurosurgeons and radiologists work together to give your child the best possible outcome. Imaging is routinely used in the operating room to guide surgeons to the abnormality, avoid regions of the brain that control important functions (such › Continue Reading

Myth Busting MRI

Technology nowadays is absolutely amazing. It allows us to capture clear images of your child’s organs and discover new diagnoses faster than ever, which enables treatments to begin earlier and earlier. This same technology also gives us many platforms and › Continue Reading

Our MRI department is filled with lots of hardworking and caring staff here at Cincinnati Children’s. We all work together to care for you and your child. As you may well know, our MRI department utilizes the resources of other departments, › Continue Reading

This year at Cincinnati Children’s we will be honoring MRI Safety Week September 21-25th. Our department has been working hard to keep our patients, families and staff safe with new changes in the MRI department. This week we will not › Continue Reading

The MRI department is once again adding a new face to the family. The scanner known as M3 has been replaced and upgraded with a brand new MRI scanner. When walking through the department, you may notice the hallway leading › Continue Reading

Conferences play an important role in keeping scientists and clinicians fresh and up-to-date on the latest technology and ideas. Every discipline has yearly meetings that bring researchers from all over the world together. Some of these meetings are huge impersonal events (e.g. the › Continue Reading

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive, non-radiation medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat complex medical conditions. MRI uses a combination of powerful magnetic fields, radio frequency pulses and reconstruction software to produce detailed internal body pictures. As › Continue Reading

If you bring your child in to the Burnet campus for an MRI scan in August, you may notice a lot of construction going on throughout the department. This is because we are replacing one of our 3 Tesla MRI › Continue Reading

The new research building at Cincinnati Children’s has plenty to offer, not the least of which is an impressive collection of artwork and architectural features. One of the most visible pieces is the multi-colored sculpture entitled Color Field Sculpture by Shelley › Continue Reading

The Cincinnati Fetal Care Center is one of the largest centers in the country offering prenatal repair of myelomeningoceles in unborn children with Chiari II malformation. Chiari II malformation is a rare abnormality involving the brain and spine. This innovative › Continue Reading

Vascular anomalies are disorders of blood vessels. Typically found in young children, they frequently present themselves as regions of skin discoloration and/or masses. They can generally be divided into two categories based on their cellular properties and behavior. The first › Continue Reading

You may have already experienced all the hard work and team effort we put forth as technologists in the radiology department at Cincinnati Children’s, but our job doesn’t stop there. We instruct dozens of college students to perform the very same › Continue Reading

Everyday here at Cincinnati Children’s we perform MRIs to evaluate the fetus, or unborn child. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a way of taking detailed pictures of the inside of the body using a magnet combined with pulses of radio › Continue Reading

Ultrasound uses sound waves to take pictures of structures inside your child’s body. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe, also known as a transducer, into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back, and a computer › Continue Reading

Much like our ever evolving facilities and features here at Cincinnati Children’s, we the employees continuously strive and strain to bring you the most up-to-date techniques and technology to deliver top notch care.  Believe it or not, we often volunteer › Continue Reading

Functional MRI (fMRI) is a special type of MRI that uses changes in brightness on MRI images in relation to local changes in brain blood flow while performing a specific task to help localize brain function. fMRI has been used › Continue Reading

A stroke results from decreased blood flow to the brain. This may result either from an occlusion, or injury to an artery supplying blood to the brain, or a vein draining blood from it. High blood pressure, diabetes, and atherosclerosis › Continue Reading

We have come such a long way using ultrasound imaging to visualize internal organs of the body. As I interview some of the Cincinnati Children’s pioneers who were involved in the beginning stages of ultrasound imaging, I realize I am › Continue Reading

At Cincinnati Children’s Radiology, we strive to provide not only safe and high-quality MRI examinations but also timely examinations. We know that our patients’ and families’ time is precious and so we strive to make our MRI examination process as › Continue Reading

When your child’s doctor orders an abdominal ultrasound, we need to look at the liver, gallbladder, pancreas, spleen, and kidneys. If anything has been eaten in the past few hours, we may not be able to see those areas well › Continue Reading

Six-year-old girl with two sites of infection demarcated by the bright appearance, one near the hip and the other near the shoulder (arrows). One of the many challenges when scanning children with difficult abnormalities or diagnoses are that there are › Continue Reading