How We Do It

Today we visit the MRI Division, in the Radiology Department of Cincinnati Children’s. Our host will be Miss Audrey Bryant, (SPEC TECH-MRI). Audrey has been working in the department for a few years now. She will be our tour guide › Continue Reading

Quick Facts: MRI

As stated in our Cincinnati Children’s Radiology website, MRI is a way to take pictures of the body using a large powerful magnet, radio waves and a computer. The computer generates detailed pictures of your body and each picture looks › Continue Reading

We asked more than 100 patients and families from the Online Community of Family Advisors,“What does a perfect Radiology patient encounter look like? – From the first interaction to the last, in what areas does Cincinnati Children’s Radiology shine and › Continue Reading

TEAM

There is no “I” in TEAM. The cardiovascular imaging section at Cincinnati Children’s has embraced this motto of esprit de corps by combining the expertise of two distinct departments–cardiology and radiology.  Cardiovascular imaging examinations at Cincinnati Children’s (CT and MRI) are › Continue Reading

A Team Approach

A few years ago, our Chair of Informatics, Dr. Alex Towbin, introduced an upgrade to our imaging software that would allow the radiologists in our department to rapidly communicate with one another while reviewing patient images. I didn’t quite understand › Continue Reading

Today in our ongoing video series of “Ask a Technologist,” we’ll visit the CT Division. Ms. Sara Smith, an advanced CT technologist, is our host. She gives us a tour around a CT scan room and answers several questions that › Continue Reading

Everyone knows technology is always changing. That’s why we replace our cell phones every two years, right? Well, in an era filled to the brim with advanced electric technology, did you also know the technology in our clothes is evolving › Continue Reading

What is it? An MR or CT arthrogram is a special test your doctor may order to better evaluate the cause of joint symptoms. Contrast material is injected into a joint (hip, shoulder, wrist, elbow, etc.) The joint is then › Continue Reading

Interventional radiologists use imaging such as x-rays, CT scanning, MRI scanning and Ultrasound to guide needles and catheters (thin tubes) while performing minimally invasive procedures such as biopsies, angiograms, tumor ablations, and injections of medications or contrast.  Augmented reality is a › Continue Reading

What do x-rays of flowers look like?  We wanted to find out, so we brought a bouquet of flowers into our Radiology Department. Our bouquet contained sunflowers, lilies, and snapdragons. We took individual x-rays of each type of flower to see › Continue Reading

One of the most exciting parts of my job as a pediatric radiologist at Cincinnati Children’s is the collaboration with other doctors and their healthcare teams. Working together, we help provide the best care for our patients. This is especially › Continue Reading

Today we visit the Radiography Division where x-rays are taken. X-rays show the bones, fluids and air in the body. They are also good for looking at foreign objects in or on the body. Our tour guide and technologist, Kylie › Continue Reading

‘What is a D.O.?’

Occasionally, you may find that your physician has a D.O. rather than an M.D. after his or her name (as I do), which often prompts the question, “What is a D.O.?” D.O. stands for Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, which is › Continue Reading

One of the most exciting parts of my job as a pediatric radiologist at Cincinnati Children’s is the collaboration with other doctors and their healthcare teams. Working together, we help provide the best care for our patients. One of my › Continue Reading

In November of 2018, I once again had the opportunity to travel to Tanzania with the Colorectal Surgical Team from Cincinnati Children’s. My role was to perform ultrasound, x-ray, and contrast radiology procedures on patients who have abnormalities of the › Continue Reading

This is the first video of a new series we’ve created. It’s a fun and fast-paced informal interview of our Radiology staff. Questions are centered on the most common ones our staff are asked about. This time we visited Nuclear › Continue Reading

Is the pediatrician concerned that your baby’s head is misshapen? If so, the doctor might order a head CT to evaluate the cranial sutures to make sure that they have not closed prematurely. A baby’s head can also become misshapen › Continue Reading

A few weeks ago, one of our Radiology blog authors, Janet Adams, wrote an article on the necessity of using Ultrasound Gel in exams. As an accompaniment to the article, the video below is a good visual demonstration of what an › Continue Reading

Hernias in kids?

Many of us may not realize that a fetus or newborn baby can have a hernia. We tend to think of a hernia as a teenage or adult problem, but there are many types of hernias. A hernia is a › Continue Reading

“When did you last eat or drink?” is a question you commonly hear the Nuclear Medicine technologists ask their PET (positron emission tomography) scan patients. Why is that so important? The radioisotope that is used in PET imaging, fluorine 18 › Continue Reading

Our MRI Department may not have magic wands, but we do have metal-detecting wands that work like magic wands. Anyone who has been through the MRI imaging process knows all too well that there will always be an extensive MRI › Continue Reading

An ultrasound is an easy, painless exam, but it can get a bit messy due to the gel that is rubbed on the skin. A question we hear quite frequently in the Ultrasound Division is, “Why do you have to use › Continue Reading

As many of you may know, either from following the Cincinnati Children’s Radiology blog or by experiencing it personally, there have been quite a few changes for the MRI Division recently. These changes are the result of the ongoing construction › Continue Reading

As a parent of a child was has Down syndrome, I am grateful to live in Cincinnati. Home to a vibrant and active Down Syndrome Association as well as one of the best children’s hospitals in the world, our city › Continue Reading

As a radiology resident, I learned how to recognize the difference between a button battery and a coin …on an x-ray film. Funny thing is, I’d never seen a button battery in real life! Where did kids find these button › Continue Reading