How We Do It

Frequently Asked Questions about this Condition Intussusception is a serious condition in which a segment of the bowel invaginates into the lumen of the adjacent segment, creating a bowel within bowel appearance. The affected bowel is prone to death due › Continue Reading

The Radiology Department recently hired two “traveling techs” or temporary employees. While other areas of Cincinnati Children’s have turned to temporary help for short-term vacancies in areas such as nursing and administrative assistance, this is a new experience for radiology, › Continue Reading

When pediatric radiologists describe the x-ray findings in our interpretation, we may use descriptive terms fancifully suggested by an abnormal appearance. Some of these “poetic” descriptive terms have been used for decades and are well known to our colleagues in radiology, › Continue Reading

Kerplunk. Crack. Waa…Waah! Broken bones, or fractures, are common in kids. Most fractures heal very well if held in the correct position and protected. So, how do our bodies do that? Immediately after a fracture occurs, the body protects the › Continue Reading

Here’s what is coming up on the Radiology Department blog this year: Every Monday in our Radiology Department, our faculty or staff give a QuIRI (Quality Improvement in Research and Imaging) Conference. Attendees are given an update on the department of the › Continue Reading

Here in the Department of Radiology at Cincinnati Children’s, we work hard every day to find better ways to help care for children. Children who are diagnosed with cancer often require frequent radiology studies. As radiologists, we work closely with › Continue Reading

In 2007, I was appointed the first Cincinnati Children’s Medical Director of Vascular Access. Vascular access refers to the processes and procedures required to gain and maintain safe intravenous access for patients so that medications and other important infusions can › Continue Reading

When I have a tough problem I usually talk it out with the Wise Old Professor of Radiology (WORP). “WOPR,” I said,“another article came out saying that there is a risk of cancer from getting a CT scan. No one › Continue Reading

Ever wonder how a child grows from infancy to full adult size? Lots of intricate things occur to signal and mold that process, many of which involve skeletal growth. In order for bones to be healthy and grow normally, there › Continue Reading

Editor’s note: This is the fifth and final part in a series of blog posts describing how the construction of Cincinnati Children’s new Critical Care Building will affect the MRI services in the Radiology Department. The previous posts described why the construction may impact our MRI services, how we › Continue Reading

Editor’s note: This is the fourth part in a series of blog posts describing how the construction of Cincinnati Children’s new Critical Care Building will affect the MRI services in the Radiology Department. The previous posts described why the construction may impact our MRI services, how we are using › Continue Reading

Q: What is the name of the new MRI location and where is it located? A: The official name is Erkenbrecher MRI and it is located at: 3404 Burnet Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45229. This location is on the corner of Burnet › Continue Reading

Editor’s note: This is the third part in a series of blog posts describing how the construction of Cincinnati Children’s new Critical Care Building will affect the MRI services in the Radiology Department. The previous posts described why the construction may impact our MRI services and how we › Continue Reading

Editor’s note: This is the second part in a series of blog posts describing how the construction of Cincinnati Children’s new Critical Care Building will affect the MRI services in the Radiology Department. The previous post described why the construction may impact our MRI › Continue Reading

Editor’s note: This is the first part in a series of blog posts describing how the construction of Cincinnati Children’s new Critical Care Building will affect the MRI services in the Radiology Department. This post describes why the construction may impact our services. The › Continue Reading

Commonly referred to as malrotation, intestinal malrotation is a condition present at birth. It is caused by abnormal development of the baby’s intestine before he or she is born. While in normal development there is a clockwise rotation of the small › Continue Reading

Finding an abnormality of a baby in pregnancy is scary and overwhelming. At Cincinnati Children’s, we have a Fetal Care Center that specializes in treating fetuses and supporting families with babies who are affected by a disease process before birth. › Continue Reading

Image: From a fMRI study in a 14-year-old patient with a large tumor (green) in the frontal part of the brain very near expected locations of the brain that control language. fMRI study was done while the patient thought about words › Continue Reading

Little League Elbow

Play ball! The baseball season is in full swing. Arm injuries are not uncommon in baseball players, including your little ace. Little League elbow is an overuse arm injury most commonly seen in adolescent baseball players. This is most common › Continue Reading

Before I was a Pediatric Radiology Fellow here in Cincinnati Children’s, I was an MRI Fellow in Baltimore. During that fellowship I became very interested in a special kind of MRI for your liver called MR elastography. We have discussed › Continue Reading

Summer in Cincinnati is a time to get outside and play! Here in the Radiology Department at Cincinnati Children’s, the nice weather also means that we are seeing more kids who need x-rays for broken bones. Did you know that › Continue Reading

Featured Image: Only for display purposes only, not of actual microbubbles Ultrasound is often the first choice for imaging children because it is not invasive, does not use radiation, does not require sedation, and is portable. At Cincinnati Children’s we use › Continue Reading

Remember back in the day when everyone had to leave their desks, line up cooperatively, and march outside for all those fire drills? Even to this day we still practice fire drills and fire safety throughout Cincinnati Children’s. Aside from › Continue Reading

“DJ” Gets a NJ

Using a Medical Puppet to Prepare Children for NJ Tube Placements For many of us eating our favorite food and sipping on a delicious drink is part of our everyday life. However, for some children, eating and drinking is a › Continue Reading

Sarhea is my 9-year-old daughter. She has cystic fibrosis and occasionally has to get different studies done in our Department of Radiology. The most recent was an MRI exam used to look at her liver. She wanted to write a › Continue Reading