Tag "MD”"

Scientists at Cincinnati Children’s have received a $6.25 million federal grant from the National Institutes of Health to lead an international research effort aimed at treating several painful diseases linked to food allergies. The principal investigator is Dr. Marc Rothenberg, director › Continue Reading

Colson Gracey was born in May 2013 with amniotic band syndrome. ABS, in which stringlike bands extend from the inner lining of the amnion and entangle a baby’s extremities, affects development in the womb. Blood flow is restricted, resulting in › Continue Reading

During his residency at Cincinnati Children’s, Dr. John Hutton saw increasing numbers of kids with medical problems related to obesity, depression and attention deficit disorder.  He longed to help kids find a way to unplug, read books and play outside. › Continue Reading

Advice abounds for new parents wondering what to feed their baby and when. But the recommendations have changed and continue to over time. In particular, there has been a turnabout with regard to allergies and infant feeding. Until five years › Continue Reading

A drug originally developed to prevent transplanted organ rejection has been shown to dramatically reduce a specific brain tumor in tuberous sclerosis patients, according to a new study led by Cincinnati Children’s. Tuberous sclerosis is a rare genetic disease that causes tumors › Continue Reading

Simply knowing a child’s home address and some socioeconomic data can serve as a vital sign – helping hospitals predict which children admitted for asthma treatment are at greater risk for re-hospitalization or additional emergency room visits, according to new › Continue Reading

Despite efforts to protect children from the dangers of all-terrain vehicles, a new study led by Cincinnati Children’s finds that new regulations intended to keep kids safe are largely ineffective. The research shows that when research team members posed as › Continue Reading

Simply knowing a child’s home address and some socioeconomic data could help serve as a vital sign. A new study shows the information can help hospitals predict which children admitted for asthma treatment are at greater risk for re-hospitalization or › Continue Reading