Radiology

May I please have a second opinion?

One of my favorite aspects of working at Cincinnati Children’s is being surrounded by colleagues who are always ready and willing to give a second opinion. As a radiologist reading exams in the reading room, I often come across cases that are not “textbook.” I am fortunate to have immediate access to other sub-specialty radiologists, some of whom are world renowned in their field, to take another look with me. Sometimes it is as simple as, “I think this is normal, do you agree?” However, some cases are very complex and I will say, “I have described about 10 abnormalities in this exam and I am having trouble putting it all together; have you ever seen this combination of findings before?” Second opinions can even turn into third and fourth opinions depending on the case. Whatever the scenario, I always get a friendly and positive response from whomever I ask.

Working in a department with this mentality is important, particularly for junior faculty as we continue to grow into this field. This practice not only helps us all become better radiologists but also ensures that we provide the best care possible for our patients. Even after working here for just over four years, there is rarely a day that goes by when I don’t ask for at least one second opinion, and I can’t imagine that will change even 20 years from now.

Contributed by Dr. Usha Nagaraj and edited by Janet Adams, (ADV TECH-ULT).

Janet M. Adams

About the Author: Janet M. Adams

Janet is a sonographer at Cincinnati Children’s. She has worked in the Ultrasound department for over 26 years, and clearly has a passion for working with children. Janet serves as a lead Safety Coach, TJC representative, and education resource for her department. She enjoys challenging exams, and is involved in local and global ultrasound research projects. When she is not at work, her 4 children and 9 grandchildren keep her very busy!

Write a comment

Comments

No Comments Yet! You can be first to comment on this post!