Healthy Living

Both asthma and vitamin D deficiency are widespread problems in the United States. In fact, about 10% of children have asthma and 50% of children are deficient in vitamin D. This vitamin has anti-inflammatory properties. It is also critical for › Continue Reading

While the thyroid is small compared to the rest of the body, it has a big job to do. This tiny, butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the neck produces thyroid hormone, which is critical for neurocognitive development as › Continue Reading

Is eating healthier one of your family’s New Year’s resolutions? Making meals at home is a great way to achieve that goal. However, more cooking at your house means that you’ll have to make more trips to the grocery store—and › Continue Reading

As a new parent, it can be overwhelming sorting through all of the advice you receive. The one you’ve probably heard the most is to put your baby on his back to sleep, to help prevent sudden infant death syndrome › Continue Reading

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a bacterial infection that occurs along the normally sterile urinary tract (kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra) and is common in children. It’s important to remember some main points about UTIs, because if your child › Continue Reading

If your child is being bullied by someone at school, you are understandably concerned. When you learn of this situation, there are two initial steps to take. The first is to remain calm. I realize that this may be easier › Continue Reading

Navigating the school years can be challenging for any parent, but can be particularly daunting when your child has ADHD. One of the most crucial first steps at the beginning of each year is to talk to your child’s teacher. › Continue Reading

When kids head back to school, they sometimes bring home more than just homework and dirty clothes. This is the time of year when we start to see a rise in cases of lice in children. According to the Centers › Continue Reading

The short answer is no. Parents are usually surprised to learn that frequent snoring in children is often concerning. Aside from when your child has a cold, which may block the nasal passageways, snoring that occurs frequently is abnormal and › Continue Reading

As a whole, adolescents and teens are getting too little sleep. The deficit starts in early adolescence and typically gets worse each year through high school. In fact, about 75-80% of seniors are getting less than eight hours on school › Continue Reading

Families face many challenges when working to get a healthy meal on the table. Time, energy, and expense are a few that come to mind. As a dietitian in the Center for Better Health and Nutrition, I’m always looking for › Continue Reading

This could easily be a satirical blog post where the author writes “250 Easy Ways to Simplify Your Family’s Morning Routine!” Because, let’s be honest, the morning struggle is real. Getting your family out of the house on time, without any › Continue Reading

Starting with my daughter’s 5-year well child visit, I could see she wasn’t a fan of getting shots. At that appointment, she ran out of the exam room in an attempt to avoid getting her 5-year immunizations. Over the years › Continue Reading

Every parent knows what it’s like to lose the lovey. Your child is upset for some reason and the only thing that will help them is the stinky, tattered, faded cuddle you can’t find. In the medical field we call them › Continue Reading

Breakfast: It Really Is Important When kids head back to school it becomes harder and harder to find time to get them to eat a healthy breakfast. Many kids want to use every last minute of the morning to sleep › Continue Reading

If you are the parent of a swimmer who is complaining of pain it’s important to take your young athlete’s concerns seriously. Most swimmers don’t have lasting pain, which means if your child does, it’s probably being caused by something › Continue Reading

My son, Bennett, is a curious, outgoing and energetic five year old. He has a love for “figuring it out” as I like to say, by exploring new things and learning how everything works. To watch him play with his › Continue Reading

Tonsils are credited with being one of the immune system’s first lines of defense – they trap airborne bacteria and virus particles as they are inhaled and keep them from entering the respiratory or GI systems. But even with all › Continue Reading

Earlier this month, Dr. Tom Kimball, a long-time cardiologist in the Heart Institute, completed a personal quest to run a marathon in all 50 states. He completed his 50th state marathon in Missoula, Montana on Sunday, July 15th, 2018. Only › Continue Reading

Kidney stone disease in children is a major health concern. Childhood rates of stone disease have increased dramatically in the last 20 years.  There are multiple causes of kidney stones, including genetic conditions, environmental factors, and dietary habits.  Kidney stones › Continue Reading

You’ve just seen it, but what is it? That black “stuff” that sometimes comes out of bath toys and swims around with your children in the bathtub. It’s mold. The same stuff you’ve probably seen on humidifiers, or anything else › Continue Reading

That’s my 10-year-old son, Parker, in the photo above. He’s riding a bike. That might sound like a fairly typical activity for a kid his age. But for him, it’s miraculous. I can’t watch it without getting choked up. It’s a › Continue Reading

Has your child been diagnosed with a conversion disorder, functional gastrointestinal or neurological disorder, chronic pain, or syncope? All of these diagnoses have something in common: somatic symptoms. Somatic symptoms are caused by disruptions in how the brain and the › Continue Reading

Achoo! It’s the time of year when seasonal allergies peak. But in reality, allergic symptoms can happen year round. That’s because there’s just as many indoor allergens as there are outdoor. And for kids with asthma and allergies, this can › Continue Reading

Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) is an illness that is both common and treatable. It can also be scary for parents because it usually affects young children and often starts with a high fever and rash. It could also › Continue Reading