Child Development and Behavior

If your child is being bullied by someone at school, you are understandably concerned. When you learn of this situation, there are two initial steps to take. The first is to remain calm. I realize that this may be easier › Continue Reading

Navigating the school years can be challenging for any parent, but can be particularly daunting when your child has ADHD. One of the most crucial first steps at the beginning of each year is to talk to your child’s teacher. › Continue Reading

The short answer is no. Parents are usually surprised to learn that frequent snoring in children is often concerning. Aside from when your child has a cold, which may block the nasal passageways, snoring that occurs frequently is abnormal and › Continue Reading

As a whole, adolescents and teens are getting too little sleep. The deficit starts in early adolescence and typically gets worse each year through high school. In fact, about 75-80% of seniors are getting less than eight hours on school › Continue Reading

This could easily be a satirical blog post where the author writes “250 Easy Ways to Simplify Your Family’s Morning Routine!” Because, let’s be honest, the morning struggle is real. Getting your family out of the house on time, without any › Continue Reading

Starting with my daughter’s 5-year well child visit, I could see she wasn’t a fan of getting shots. At that appointment, she ran out of the exam room in an attempt to avoid getting her 5-year immunizations. Over the years › Continue Reading

Every parent knows what it’s like to lose the lovey. Your child is upset for some reason and the only thing that will help them is the stinky, tattered, faded cuddle you can’t find. In the medical field we call them › Continue Reading

My son, Bennett, is a curious, outgoing and energetic five year old. He has a love for “figuring it out” as I like to say, by exploring new things and learning how everything works. To watch him play with his › Continue Reading

Has your child been diagnosed with a conversion disorder, functional gastrointestinal or neurological disorder, chronic pain, or syncope? All of these diagnoses have something in common: somatic symptoms. Somatic symptoms are caused by disruptions in how the brain and the › Continue Reading

I think most parents would agree that talking about sex and sexting with your child – regardless of the age – can be awkward. It may be tempting to put off the conversation as long as possible. However, it’s important › Continue Reading

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an often misunderstood condition. Obsessions, as I like to explain to my younger patients, are thoughts that they can’t get out of their heads. Compulsions are the behaviors that they feel like they have to do. › Continue Reading

What does a healthy body look like? There is no straightforward answer. The media often tells us that an ideal, healthy body is thin and muscular. However, a healthy body varies extremely in both size and shape.  For example, a › Continue Reading

Bedwetting can be stressful and frustrating for the entire family. Parents may get discouraged when new treatments fail. And children often feel guilty, anxious and helpless when they are unable to stay dry at night. Further, they often have significantly › Continue Reading

Whether your child wants to make an elite soccer team, get an ‘A’ on a test, or simply make more friends, healthy self-confidence plays a key role in making it happen. What’s exciting about kids’ self-confidence is that we, as › Continue Reading

Typically, ADHD is diagnosed during the school years, particularly around age 7. But it is possible to diagnose it as early as four years old. However, it is a difficult diagnosis to make at this young age. All preschoolers, by › Continue Reading

As a parent of three teenagers, I worry about a lot of things. At the top of that list are the challenges they face as they begin making their own decisions. Adolescents and young adults have a tremendous amount of › Continue Reading

Kids will be heading back to school before we know it! Whether your child is excited about the new year or dreading it, this period of time is always an adjustment. So how can parents help their children get mentally prepared › Continue Reading

Kids are not little adults, but they certainly experience many of the same emotions that we do. Anger is something that everyone endures – from “typical” kids to kids who have other health diagnoses like depression, anxiety, or ADHD.  And › Continue Reading

Is my child’s language development normal? It’s one of the most frequently asked questions we receive in speech-language pathology. While every child is different and develops in his or her own way, there are “typical” paths that most babies on › Continue Reading

All over the world and especially in the United States, we are seeing puberty start at an earlier age. As a pediatric and adolescent gynecologist, it’s no different in my office. While the average age for a girl’s period to › Continue Reading

Whenever a type of crisis event happens, such as a terrorist attack, many parents struggle with how to talk to their kids about it. In my opinion, it’s important to discuss these events with them. In all likelihood, they’ve already › Continue Reading

It is problematic for teenage girls to have irregular or missed periods. But the perception I have gleaned from speaking with many of them is that missed periods are ‘not a big deal’ and ‘happen all the time’ to their › Continue Reading

Child Life Month is celebrated every March, honoring the caregivers who go above and beyond medicine for patients and families every day. The members of our Child Life and Integrative Care team play a significant role in both inpatient and › Continue Reading

When you see your child all-of-a-sudden struggling to get words out, it can be concerning.  This is especially true if your child, who previously had no difficulty speaking, is now stuttering out of the blue.  Fortunately, about 75% of children › Continue Reading

Let’s face it. We’re all stressed, and our teenagers are no exception. They have higher expectations to perform better in school, excel in extracurricular activities and community service, and respond to social media. It’s no surprise that teen stress levels › Continue Reading