Heart Conditions

Recently, I joined some colleagues from Denmark and the US to publish a study. It found a higher risk of dementia in adults who were born with congenital heart disease (CHD). In particular, we discovered a significantly higher risk for › Continue Reading

Dear Heart Donor Family: That name seems so cold considering the role you now play in our lives. You saved our son’s life. We’ve thought about you a thousand times. We’ve wondered how you are coping. We know you miss › Continue Reading

Twenty years ago my son was born with a heart condition called tetralogy of Fallot. When I found out I was shocked and had a million questions fluttering through my mind. Gabe has a congenital heart defect? Something is wrong › Continue Reading

I was born with pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect and multiple aortopulmonary collateral arteries. To put it simple, I was born with a hole in the bottom half of my heart, no pulmonary valve, and lots of tiny arteries › Continue Reading

We had never heard of pulmonary hypertension until December 2014. Now we know that it happens when the blood flow that leaves the right side of the heart faces an increased resistance, increasing pressure on that side of the heart.  › Continue Reading

Our son, Henry, is a patient in the Heart Institute. He has tetralogy of Fallot and had open heart surgery on November 17, 2015. He had this procedure when he was five months old to correct some of the defects caused by his condition. We have pursued › Continue Reading

Kawasaki disease is one of those conditions that many people haven’t heard of, until one of their loved ones is affected. While it is rare, it is important to be aware of because it can be easily misdiagnosed as other › Continue Reading

Have you ever wondered how it is possible that you can solve problems around the house, achieve goals at work, or finish a challenging task? This is due to something called executive function (EF). EF is a group of thinking › Continue Reading

We’ve all read about the rare stories in the news where a teen collapses on a court or field from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). As parents, they shake us to our very core. For cardiologists like me, they haunt us. › Continue Reading

As a child living with a congenital heart defect (CHD), I knew that I was different. I went to the doctor a lot more often than my friends did. I had scars all over my chest and back. My parents › Continue Reading

Our identical twin daughters, Selah and Shylah, celebrate their second birthday today. And while this is an exciting milestone for any parent, it feels particularly victorious for us because our girls were born conjoined by the lower third of their chests to the navel, and shared › Continue Reading

This is a tale that I never imagined I would be telling. A tale that involves both of my children being diagnosed with restrictive cardiomyopathy, and both needing heart transplants within three years of each other. Katie’s Tale It all › Continue Reading

Cardiomyopathy is a heart disease that can be life threatening, especially if you don’t know you have it. Some people have no symptoms of the disease. Others have symptoms but aren’t aware that they need to act on them. You › Continue Reading

If you knew a family member or friend had a potentially dangerous or catastrophic health issue but wasn’t seeing a doctor for it, would you recommend that they see one? I think the vast majority of us would. In my › Continue Reading

There’s a very real health issue happening right now – well, it’s been going on for the last 3-4 decades – and we haven’t been able to break through the “noise” to spread awareness for it. I need your help. › Continue Reading

If you have had a child born with a heart defect, you may be concerned that future pregnancies will result in a similar outcome. Congenital heart defects (CHD) are common and impact more than 40,000 babies each year. The chance of › Continue Reading

I was born in Dayton, Ohio in 1971 with transposition of the great arteries (TGA). This means my pulmonary artery and aorta were in reverse position, preventing oxygen rich blood from pumping into the body. TGA babies had a blue tint › Continue Reading

Because I was born with double outlet right ventricle, a type of congenital heart defect, along with additional heart conditions, I never thought that it would be possible for me to carry a child. In fact, for most of my › Continue Reading

This quote is appropriately displayed on our participants’ bib holders, which they will be able to frame after they finish the progressive Flying Pig Marathon: “The miracle isn’t that I finished. The miracle is that I had the courage to › Continue Reading

Henry arrived after an easy pregnancy and smooth delivery. Soon after his birth one of his nurses casually mentioned that she heard a heart murmur. I convinced myself it was just a benign murmur, something that would fix itself or › Continue Reading

Today – March 6 – is a special day for us. It is our son Ryan’s birthday (see Part 1 of our story here). We’re excited to share the final part of this story today because it turns out this › Continue Reading

When our son Ryan was born with a congenital heart defect (CHD), the world as our family knew it was turned upside down. If you didn’t read that part of our story yesterday, please go read it here and then › Continue Reading

Our son Ryan has always been a heart warrior – that’s part of the deal when you’re diagnosed with a congenital heart defect (CHD) as a baby. But he and our family didn’t truly become heart advocates until a fateful visit › Continue Reading

One of the most common threads we hear from parents is the challenge of understanding and describing your child’s congenital heart disease to friends and family. That’s why we developed nine congenital heart disease animations for families to view and share. But › Continue Reading

Lego fanatic! So many kids are these days, but my son James epitomizes the title. My daughter loves them, too, but he eats, sleeps, and breathes Legos. So of course “Art of the Brick” at Cincinnati Museum Center was top › Continue Reading