This year’s flu season has officially begun, with widespread activity reported locally and by the CDC throughout Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana.   At Cincinnati Children’s, we have seen a rise in patients with confirmed flu the past couple of weeks. › Continue Reading

Whooping cough, a highly contagious respiratory disease, is an illness that most parents are aware of and understand how serious it can get. But because we have seen an uptick in cases the past couple of weeks, now is a › Continue Reading

It’s been 10 years since the introduction of the HPV vaccine (human papillomavirus) in 2006. A lot has happened since then, including a new study confirming how highly effective the HPV vaccine is. Because of that, I thought it would be worthwhile to provide › Continue Reading

I get it. Very few kids willingly receive vaccines. In fact, if parents can get in and out of the doctor’s office without tears on visits that contain shots, it feels like a small miracle. Because of this reality, I › Continue Reading

As we get closer to back-to-school time, parents are naturally thinking about what school supplies their children need for the upcoming year. I think this period of time also offers the opportunity to remind parents that several states, including Ohio, › Continue Reading


While it has been a relatively mild flu season so far, we have been seeing more patients with RSV (respiratory syncytial virus). It tends to peak between the months of December and March but can happen at any time during the › Continue Reading

With help from the news media, the measles exposure at Disneyland in California has given healthcare professionals a renewed opportunity to share information about measles with parents of the children for whom we care. The full scope of the illness › Continue Reading

Each influenza season is different from the last because the viruses that circulate change from year to year and immunity from season to season is not long lasting. Vaccines are prepared each year based on predictions and mathematical models of › Continue Reading

There is certainly no lack of information or opinions about the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Sorting through all of the information that’s out there can be daunting, especially if you’re trying to make a decision about whether or not to › Continue Reading

There’s no denying it, it’s flu season. And RSV season. And cold season. It seems everyone probably knows someone who is sick. It’s that time of year. But that doesn’t mean it’s time to sit back and wait for respiratory › Continue Reading

The bacteria bordetella pertussis has taken up residence in Greater Cincinnati and is leaving many babies, children and adults gasping for their breath. Bordatella pertussis is the bacteria which causes pertussis illness, more commonly known as whooping cough. And per › Continue Reading

March 8, 2012 – The twins are sick! Both of them have fevers and are coughing a ton! March 11, 2012 – Still both very sick and haven’t slept much since Thursday night. Fevers are very high – going to › Continue Reading

No one likes shots. No one likes receiving them and I don’t know a single health care provider that enjoys administering them.  But they’re a necessary reality to keep babies, children, and even adults from contracting devastating diseases. In fact, › Continue Reading

Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s recently published a study showing that the human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV) has been effective in decreasing HPV infection, not only in immunized teenage girls but also in those who are not immunized. This is a phenomenon › Continue Reading

From Cincinnati to Mexico to Belgium to Australia, vaccines to protect against rotavirus are significantly reducing deaths and hospitalizations from severe childhood diarrhea. Worldwide, rotavirus causes more than 453,000 deaths a year, according to the latest mortality estimates. That’s down › Continue Reading

Even in a world of modern antibiotics, meningitis maintains a stubborn foothold. This bacterial infection of membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord continues to kill or permanently disable an alarming number of infants, children and adults. Effective vaccination programs › Continue Reading

The best way to disrupt the spread of influenza is immunization for everyone — even the healthiest people — beginning at 6 months of age. But what about the very young — infants under 6 months for whom no flu › Continue Reading

The best way to disrupt the spread of influenza is immunization for everyone — even the healthiest people — beginning at 6 months of age. That’s what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends. And more and more studies › Continue Reading

Flu season 2010-11 is fast approaching and as part of our preparation for this year’s strains of influenza, we’re remembering lessons from last year’s H1N1 pandemic. It was a flu season unlike any that we’ve seen before. With H1N1, we › Continue Reading

This is a recap of recent health news featuring Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. We hope you enjoy this week’s edition of collected news, and please feel free to offer comments below – we really do listen! The Devastating Impact of Bullies USA › Continue Reading

Maybe we just need to scare the hell out of people. That was the message from one the country’s leading advocates for childhood immunizations during a talk last week at the American Academy of Pediatrics annual meeting in San Francisco. After › Continue Reading

California’s whooping cough epidemic could be the worst in 50 years. As of late July, the state reported nearly 2,200 cases of the bacterial infection, including seven deaths — all infants younger than two months. And now whooping cough is › Continue Reading

Stamping out disease may have seemed like nothing more than a pipe dream a few generations ago, but today we know the power of modern medicine: once common diseases like small pox and polio are now usually only mentioned in › Continue Reading

The British medical journal Lancet yesterday announced its decision to officially retract Andrew Wakefield’s 1998 study linking autism and the MMR vaccine. The decision was the result of long standing scientific concerns about the article – more than a dozen studies › Continue Reading

The H1N1 vaccine is now available to the public, but instead of making plans to get the vaccine, many families are writing it off and encouraging other families to do the same. This, and an increasing trend among young, educated › Continue Reading