Tag "adult congenital heart disease"

My oldest son, Austin, celebrates his 25th birthday in May. It’s quite a milestone, given that three years ago his heart stopped beating and he collapsed on a softball field. And that’s not even the beginning of his story. Austin’s › Continue Reading

Adults who were born with congenital heart disease (CHD) need to be followed by a cardiologist with specific training on the condition. Adults with CHD typically fall into two categories: those who have been seen all along, and those who › Continue Reading

Recently, I joined some colleagues from Denmark and the US to publish a study. It found a higher risk of dementia in adults who were born with congenital heart disease (CHD). In particular, we discovered a significantly higher risk for › Continue Reading

I was born with pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect and multiple aortopulmonary collateral arteries. To put it simple, I was born with a hole in the bottom half of my heart, no pulmonary valve, and lots of tiny arteries › Continue Reading

Have you ever wondered how it is possible that you can solve problems around the house, achieve goals at work, or finish a challenging task? This is due to something called executive function (EF). EF is a group of thinking › Continue Reading

Adults with complex congenital heart disease require lifelong expert care to avoid complications such as arrhythmia, heart failure, infection, stroke or premature death. The Heart Institute’s Adolescent and Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program at Cincinnati Children’s ensures adolescents and adults › Continue Reading

Roz Swiney is 56 years old, but she’s a patient at Cincinnati Children’s. Swiney was born with a heart defect and had just one ventricle. Surgery helped for a while but she began to experience complications. When she went into › Continue Reading

25-year-old David Franz has survived being born with a single ventricle, multiple open-heart surgeries, heart failure, a temporary device to assist his heart to pump, the dislodging of this device requiring a full volume of blood to be replaced, a › Continue Reading

As a child living with a congenital heart defect (CHD), I knew that I was different. I went to the doctor a lot more often than my friends did. I had scars all over my chest and back. My parents › Continue Reading

If you knew a family member or friend had a potentially dangerous or catastrophic health issue but wasn’t seeing a doctor for it, would you recommend that they see one? I think the vast majority of us would. In my › Continue Reading

There’s a very real health issue happening right now. Well, it’s been going on for the last 3-4 decades. And we haven’t been able to break through the “noise” to spread awareness for it. I need your help. I’m referring › Continue Reading

If you have had a child born with a heart defect, you may be concerned that future pregnancies will result in a similar outcome. Congenital heart defects (CHD) are common and impact more than 40,000 babies each year. The chance of › Continue Reading

Because I was born with double outlet right ventricle, a type of congenital heart defect, along with additional heart conditions, I never thought that it would be possible for me to carry a child. In fact, for most of my › Continue Reading
The short answer is: it depends. If you have congenital heart disease and are thinking about becoming pregnant, or if you already are pregnant, you need to speak with a high-risk obstetrician (maternal fetal medicine (MFM) specialist) and a cardiologist › Continue Reading