Tag "heart surgery"

A Letter To My Son’s Heart Surgeon: I passed you in the hall today. I recognized you immediately, even though we’ve only spoken a few times. Your face and your hands are emblazoned in my memory. You held my son’s › Continue Reading

Our son, Henry, is a patient in the Heart Institute. He has tetralogy of Fallot and had open heart surgery on November 17, 2015. He had this procedure when he was five months old to correct some of the defects caused by his condition. We have pursued › Continue Reading

Think of coronary artery disease and what comes to mind is an older adult with hardening of the arteries. But that’s not what you’ll find at the Pediatric Coronary Artery Clinic at Cincinnati Children’s. Here, at one of only five › Continue Reading

Kentucky Children’s Hospital has begun performing pediatric heart surgeries in partnership with Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. The program follows a “one program-two sites” model, with identical programs at Kentucky Children’s Hospital, part of UK HealthCare in Lexington, and Cincinnati › Continue Reading

I was born in Dayton, Ohio in 1971 with transposition of the great arteries (TGA). This means my pulmonary artery and aorta were in reverse position, preventing oxygen rich blood from pumping into the body. TGA babies had a blue tint › Continue Reading

Henry arrived after an easy pregnancy and smooth delivery. Soon after his birth one of his nurses casually mentioned that she heard a heart murmur. I convinced myself it was just a benign murmur, something that would fix itself or › Continue Reading

One of the most common threads we hear from parents is the challenge of understanding and describing your child’s congenital heart disease to friends and family. That’s why we developed nine congenital heart disease animations for families to view and share. But › Continue Reading

Cincinnati Children’s finalized plans to partner with the University of Kentucky to rebuild its pediatric heart program at Kentucky Children’s Hospital. The one-program, two-site approach will allow more Kentucky children to receive cardiac care closer to home.. “Part of our › Continue Reading

Lego fanatic! So many kids are these days, but my son James epitomizes the title. My daughter loves them, too, but he eats, sleeps, and breathes Legos. So of course “Art of the Brick” at Cincinnati Museum Center was top › Continue Reading

The town of Warsaw, Kentucky, came together to wish 5-year-old Adelyn Kluemper good luck as she left for Cincinnati Children’s for heart surgery. Adelyn has had 5 surgeries including one on her kidney, one on her colon, and three on › Continue Reading

Cincinnati Children’s and the University of Kentucky Healthcare have signed a Letter of Intent to partner together to offer pediatric heart services at Kentucky Children’s Hospital in Lexington. The two sites/one program model is designed to provide the best care › Continue Reading

Our journey with Alexander began when my wife, Erin, was 28 weeks into pregnancy. After three consecutive mornings of prenatal imaging, we learned that our son’s heart was in a problem zone. The first appointment was a routine ultrasound at › Continue Reading

The next big thing in imaging was recently used to help prepare our team for a rare and complex heart procedure. Over the last year, Cincinnati Children’s Heart Institute has been creating patient-specific 3-dimensional (3D) complex congenital heart disease models › Continue Reading

You have probably never heard my son’s name, Max Page, but you might recognize him. He was the mini Darth Vader in the 2011 Volkswagen Super Bowl commercial. Soon after it was aired the commercial went viral and the media › Continue Reading

Like many of you, I’m looking forward to watching the XXII Olympic Winter Games in Sochi. I am particularly excited to watch Shaun White compete against the world’s other elite snowboarders in the halfpipe competition next week. Although it is › Continue Reading

Seven-year-old Lydia Butler’s medical journey began when she was five days old and her parents found out she had a heart murmur. Tests showed she had tricuspid atresia, a defect that blocked the blood flow from her heart to her › Continue Reading