Posts From Janet M. Adams

Frequently Asked Questions about this Condition Intussusception is a serious condition in which a segment of the bowel invaginates into the lumen of the adjacent segment, creating a bowel within bowel appearance. The affected bowel is prone to death due › Continue Reading

The Radiology Department recently hired two “traveling techs” or temporary employees. While other areas of Cincinnati Children’s have turned to temporary help for short-term vacancies in areas such as nursing and administrative assistance, this is a new experience for radiology, › Continue Reading

When pediatric radiologists describe the x-ray findings in our interpretation, we may use descriptive terms fancifully suggested by an abnormal appearance. Some of these “poetic” descriptive terms have been used for decades and are well known to our colleagues in radiology, › Continue Reading

Kerplunk. Crack. Waa…Waah! Broken bones, or fractures, are common in kids. Most fractures heal very well if held in the correct position and protected. So, how do our bodies do that? Immediately after a fracture occurs, the body protects the › Continue Reading

“Thank you for your service!” is a frequently heard refrain from people when they see that you are a veteran of the armed services, and it always causes me to stand a little taller and feel pride well up inside.  › Continue Reading

In 2007, I was appointed the first Cincinnati Children’s Medical Director of Vascular Access. Vascular access refers to the processes and procedures required to gain and maintain safe intravenous access for patients so that medications and other important infusions can › Continue Reading

Ever wonder how a child grows from infancy to full adult size? Lots of intricate things occur to signal and mold that process, many of which involve skeletal growth. In order for bones to be healthy and grow normally, there › Continue Reading

One of my favorite aspects of working at Cincinnati Children’s is being surrounded by colleagues who are always ready and willing to give a second opinion. As a radiologist reading exams in the reading room, I often come across cases › Continue Reading

“Aunty,” Jem spoke up, “Atticus says you can choose your friends but you sho’ can’t choose your family, an’ they’re still kin to you no matter whether you acknowledge ’em or not, and it makes you look right silly when › Continue Reading

Collaboration between different departments and different medical specialties is one of the many reasons why Cincinnati Children’s can offer cutting-edge, state-of-the-art care for your child. One excellent example of that collaborative spirit is the partnership between the departments of Surgery and › Continue Reading

I knew as a child that I wanted to become a doctor and better understand why we get sick. My favorite classes in medical school were anatomy, physiology, and pathology. I pay close attention to detail and enjoy the intellectual › Continue Reading

Summer in Cincinnati is a time to get outside and play! Here in the Radiology Department at Cincinnati Children’s, the nice weather also means that we are seeing more kids who need x-rays for broken bones. Did you know that › Continue Reading

Last year, I finished my pediatric radiology fellowship and was hired on as a faculty radiologist at Cincinnati Children’s. One week I was a fellow, and the next a faculty member. I was nervous about the decision to stay at › Continue Reading

At Cincinnati Children’s, we perform ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate babies that have been diagnosed with a problem in the womb before birth.  Our Fetal Care Center is one of the most innovative in the country, providing › Continue Reading

It’s a scene we see everyday- a worried parent comes to the Radiology Department for an intimidating test on their child. Their pediatrician has requested the exam as part of an attempt to sort out why the child is having › Continue Reading

How We Clean in CT

I have had the privilege of working in the CT Division of Radiology at Cincinnati Children’s for 11 years. One thing I can tell you with certainty is that we care a great deal about infection control. We have signs › Continue Reading

With winter upon us, more and more young children are visiting their doctors for symptoms such as fever, cough and difficulty breathing. Children presenting with these symptoms (especially in the fall and winter months) are often suffering from a lower › Continue Reading

Radiologists  have traditionally been behind-the-scenes doctors who interpret imaging studies (x-ray, CT, MRI, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, and fluoroscopy) ordered by other doctors. However, radiologists have increasingly become more directly involved with patients in an effort to provide the best care › Continue Reading

The Ultrasound Division at Cincinnati Children’s Radiology will soon be starting a new procedure involving bubbles! This procedure involves the use of contrast, which will help characterize non-specific lesions, assess blood flow to tissues and organs, and demonstrate vesicoureteral reflux. › Continue Reading

Ultrasound has always been an integral part of patient care at Cincinnati Children’s. Its use of sound waves instead of radiation as well as its portability and cost make it an ideal imaging option for our pediatric patients. Cincinnati Children’s › Continue Reading

One of the things that I enjoy most about my job here at Cincinnati Children’s is being involved in interdisciplinary conferences. This past year I became involved in our Neuro-oncology Tumor Board, and it has been a tremendous experience for › Continue Reading

I became a father on the day before my very own birthday. My daughter came into this world with an ease and grace that was astounding to behold. We took her home and she continues to thrive and amaze us › Continue Reading

Have you ever wondered why it’s so dark in an ultrasound scan room? Many patients question why we turn the lights down when they come in for a scan. The answer is simple: so we can see better! The retina › Continue Reading

March Fractures

Featured Image: T2 image lateral view shows the bright signal and dark fracture line stress fracture (arrow) With spring and warmer weather right around the corner, sports seasons change and children’s physical activity levels may increase. Bones constantly repair and › Continue Reading

Cincinnati Children’s is the only hospital in the United States to have a magnetic resonance (MR) unit in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We feel this was important since babies are fragile, have trouble maintaining normal temperature, and do not handle › Continue Reading