Tag "mental health"

As an adult with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) and mother of three children—one of whom also has T1D—I have learned that this chronic illness can easily present mental and emotional challenges. My experience, however, has also taught me that parents › Continue Reading

It’s important for children to be introduced to a wide range of characters in literature. When they read about characters who are different from themselves, their horizons expand. And when kids read about characters similar to themselves, it can help › Continue Reading

Whether your child wants to make an elite soccer team, get an ‘A’ on a test, or simply make more friends, healthy self-confidence plays a key role in making it happen. What’s exciting about kids’ self-confidence is that we, as › Continue Reading

Whenever a type of crisis event happens, such as a terrorist attack, many parents struggle with how to talk to their kids about it. In my opinion, it’s important to discuss these events with them. In all likelihood, they’ve already › Continue Reading

The pressure of being a kid is taking more and more teenagers and preteens down a dark path. Children are dealing with anxiety, depression, and having thoughts of suicide. Doctors at Cincinnati Children’s have seen a 5 to 10 percent › Continue Reading

Over the past couple of years there have been some trailblazers in the transgender community, helping to build awareness for this group of people. Transgender is an umbrella term for people who experience their gender differently from their gender at › Continue Reading

It might seem counter-intuitive to have perfectionism and failure in the same sentence. But if your children have perfectionistic tendencies, balancing the relationship between the two can help them cope better with the challenges that most certainly lie ahead. There › Continue Reading

Resiliency. It’s a word that’s spoken about frequently with psychologists working with youth – and with good reason. Adversity is an inevitable part of the human experience. Whether due to potentially life-changing situations (e.g., having a major illness, experiencing loss, › Continue Reading

 As a nurse who teaches suicide prevention, I believe knowing the warning signs of suicide can be especially helpful for parents who might not have considered the possibility of this happening to their child. However, it is also important to › Continue Reading

Studies suggest that the majority of people who die from suicide give warning signs beforehand. And while teen suicides tend to peak around certain times and events of the year, the reality is that it can occur at any time. › Continue Reading

Cincinnati Children’s President & CEO Michael Fisher led a group of dignitaries, mental-health-care experts including Dr. Michael Sorter, and members of our Board of Trustees in the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the $14.5 million expansion of the College Hill Campus. The › Continue Reading

This is my and my daughter’s second year participating in Patiently Made, and we love it. Patiently Made started last year as a way to have patients, staff and members of the Patient and Family Advisory Council create artwork for › Continue Reading

If your child or teen has been struggling with depression, you may be understandably worried. I mention “child” because it is not uncommon for a child to be depressed. While it does not happen as often in children as it › Continue Reading

Originally intended as an effort to personalize the space at the newly renovated east wing of Cincinnati Children’s College Hill Campus, a new gallery called “Patiently Made” is proving that art can be a therapeutic outlet for young patients, while › Continue Reading

A Cincinnati mother is searching for resources and support to help her deal with the mental health issues of her 13-year-old son who suffers from early-onset bipolar disorder, autism and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Dr. Michael Sorter at Cincinnati Children’s weighs › Continue Reading

Author’s Note: It is important to see a physician who is specially trained in the treatment of eating disorders if one is suspected.  Part of the process of diagnosing an eating disorder is ruling out other causes of the signs › Continue Reading

It was spring of 2013, and it started out like any other second Thursday of the month. The Patient and Family Advisory Council gathered to discuss the usual things, like ways to ensure and enhance the best experience for patients › Continue Reading

… a lot more than most of us realize. According to the Centers for Disease Control, each year, 4,600 young lives end too soon as a result of suicide. In a nationwide survey of youth in 9th to 12th grade, 16% › Continue Reading

As we approach the 5 year anniversary of my son-in-law Rob’s death, I reflect mostly on how his decision has affected the lives of his two daughters, Sam and Emma. Suicide has been described as ‘a permanent solution to a temporary problem,’ › Continue Reading

The Power of a Story

Over the last month or so, I’ve been doing a lot of reflecting on 2012, and I’ve come to realize that when you share your story, others are willing to share theirs and big things happen. As people learn about our › Continue Reading

After several months of public speaking, newsletters, personal invitations and phone calls, my granddaughter Sam and her team ROCKED at Cincinnati Walks for Kids on October 20, 2012. She took her place on the stage at the walk that Saturday › Continue Reading

On March 30, 2008, my son-in-law, Rob, took his own life.  We were celebrating my granddaughter’s 10th birthday when the call came in.  Rob left his 2 little girls, his wife and the rest of his family that day….That was › Continue Reading