Tag "MRI"

If you’ve been to Burnet Campus lately, you have probably noticed major changes happening! The most apparent modifications are the expansive Critical Care Building project and renovation of clinical space. The one we’d like to make you aware of today › Continue Reading

Here in the Department of Radiology at Cincinnati Children’s, we work hard every day to find better ways to help care for children. Children who are diagnosed with cancer often require frequent radiology studies. As radiologists, we work closely with › Continue Reading

Finding an abnormality of a baby in pregnancy is scary and overwhelming. At Cincinnati Children’s, we have a Fetal Care Center that specializes in treating fetuses and supporting families with babies who are affected by a disease process before birth. › Continue Reading

I knew as a child that I wanted to become a doctor and better understand why we get sick. My favorite classes in medical school were anatomy, physiology, and pathology. I pay close attention to detail and enjoy the intellectual › Continue Reading

MR Ergometer

As you probably have come to expect from Cincinnati Children’s Radiology Department, we are constantly trying to push the envelope everyday and in every way: from the way we tackle new and improved technologies to how we go above and › Continue Reading

With each passing day we find ourselves closer and closer to the big day: Christmas. Amidst the hustle and bustle we also find ourselves scouring the city for the perfect gift. East-siders venture into the Westside and West-siders travel to › Continue Reading

Each year, various Radiology modalities at Cincinnati Children’s complete the process of accreditation through the American College of Radiology (ACR), which is one of several accrediting bodies. The ACR is the most comprehensive program that provides a pathway for evaluation › Continue Reading

Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a non-invasive imaging exam that uses radio waves and magnetic and fields gradients to generate anatomic images of a body part. It does not use ionizing radiation like CTs or x-rays. Prior to MR › Continue Reading

After walking through the main concourse of our hospital, we think anyone could agree that Cincinnati Children’s is not like most medical facilities. We have vibrant colors, animalistic artwork and kid-friendly interactive decorations. There is so much creative contrast, some children › Continue Reading

Obesity is a major public health problem, and obesity among children is becoming increasingly common. Obesity can impact multiple body organs and systems and is associated with other diseases such as diabetes. One of the organs that is particularly impacted › Continue Reading

Some babies who are born prematurely require long durations of respiratory support due to underdeveloped lungs and are given a clinical diagnosis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Over the past 20 years, research has fueled improvement in the clinical care and › Continue Reading

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to evaluate the progression of lung disease in pediatric patients. Premature infants, for example, very often experience pulmonary complications and could greatly benefit from several imaging check-ups over time. Computed tomography (CT) is › Continue Reading

Hi, I’m Maria A. Calvo Garcia, associate professor of Radiology at Cincinnati Children’s. My area of subspecialty is fetal imaging, in which we combine the use of ultrasound and fetal MRI to help in the diagnosis of potential problems that can affect babies › Continue Reading

With the arrival of spring comes baseball. (Go Reds!) And if you have a tiny Bronson Arroyo in your home, you know that with the baseball season comes some potential injuries that could land your heat-throwing All-Star on the dreaded › Continue Reading

As you may or may not know, technologists working in Radiology have an obligation to keep up with their continuing education throughout their entire careers. Much like with registered nurses, this is to prove we maintain performing at the same › Continue Reading

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an imaging method that uses the protons of hydrogen atoms within the body to generate a medical image. MRI of the lungs has historically been challenging for a few different reasons. One reason is that › Continue Reading

The pancreas has two major jobs: one is to produce insulin, which helps control blood sugar, while the other is to produce fluid that helps digest food. Diseases that affect the pancreas can disrupt one or both of these functions. › Continue Reading

When a girl is born with an anorectal malformation, she can sometimes have anomalies of her vagina, uterus, ovaries, kidneys or bladder. We’ll be focusing on vaginal anomalies, including imperforate hymen, partial agenesis of the vagina and complete agenesis of the › Continue Reading

“Why does my child need an MRI in addition to his PET/CT?” “Why does my child need a CT in addition to her PET/CT?” These are questions we are asked frequently by caregivers and patients who are being imaged after a diagnosis › Continue Reading

Here at Cincinnati Children’s, we are committed to constantly keeping each one of our patients’ thoughts, feelings, and experiences in the forefront of everything we do. This ranges from how we decorate the departments to which technologies we invest effort into › Continue Reading

Even though the nuclear medicine community is unfamiliar to many people outside of the medical field, it is a commonly used modality to image virtually every part of the body. There are many interesting facts about this field. I’m going › Continue Reading

Radiation exposure from medical tests is a hot topic in the news. While all of us are exposed to small amounts of radiation daily from sources such as the sun, the food we eat, and the buildings we live in, › Continue Reading

Dr. Alan E. Oestreich, Emeritus Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati and Emeritus Radiologist at Cincinnati Children’s, and Dr. Marguerite M. Caré, Assistant Professor at the University of Cincinnati and an attending pediatric neuroradiologist at Cincinnati Children’s, have › Continue Reading

Image: Tony with his QI co-workers, Erin Adkins (left) and Emily Mueller. Tony Dandino began his career at Cincinnati Children’s as an MRI technologist four years ago. He plays various roles in MRI, including managing the work flow while working as charge technologist, › Continue Reading

Considering magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been around since the late 1970’s, most people have seen, heard about, or even experienced an MRI for themselves. It is not, however, customary to have much information about functional MRIs (fMRI) and its combination of still › Continue Reading