Tag "ultrasound"

When we think of an ultrasound exam, it is usually in relation to pregnancy. The exam can let us see the fetus in the mother’s womb, giving us a look at possible birth defects, the sex of the child, if › Continue Reading

In November of 2018, I once again had the opportunity to travel to Tanzania with the Colorectal Surgical Team from Cincinnati Children’s. My role was to perform ultrasound, x-ray, and contrast radiology procedures on patients who have abnormalities of the › Continue Reading

A few weeks ago, one of our Radiology blog authors, Janet Adams, wrote an article on the necessity of using Ultrasound Gel in exams. As an accompaniment to the article, the video below is a good visual demonstration of what an › Continue Reading

An ultrasound is an easy, painless exam, but it can get a bit messy due to the gel that is rubbed on the skin. A question we hear quite frequently in the Ultrasound Division is, “Why do you have to use › Continue Reading

Finding an abnormality of a baby in pregnancy is scary and overwhelming. At Cincinnati Children’s, we have a Fetal Care Center that specializes in treating fetuses and supporting families with babies who are affected by a disease process before birth. › Continue Reading

Featured Image: Only for display purposes only, not of actual microbubbles Ultrasound is often the first choice for imaging children because it is not invasive, does not use radiation, does not require sedation, and is portable. At Cincinnati Children’s we use › Continue Reading

At Cincinnati Children’s, we perform ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate babies that have been diagnosed with a problem in the womb before birth.  Our Fetal Care Center is one of the most innovative in the country, providing › Continue Reading

Technology is advancing, and more and more often we are able to track disease with imaging, thereby avoiding biopsy. One relatively new imaging technique that we are very excited about it shear wave elastography (SWE). SWE is done with an › Continue Reading

  Photo: Anita Robbins (right) and co-worker Cieara Presley (left) helped Anita decorate the tree. Since 2008, Cincinnati Children’s has held a Holiday Tree Decoration Contest for its employees/departments to welcome in the holidays and to create a beautiful and › Continue Reading

The Safety Award is given each quarter to the Radiology employee who receives the most safety-related Above and Beyond awards. Our Above and Beyond is an online system that we use to nominate/recognize employees who have gone above and beyond › Continue Reading

The Ultrasound Division at Cincinnati Children’s Radiology will soon be starting a new procedure involving bubbles! This procedure involves the use of contrast, which will help characterize non-specific lesions, assess blood flow to tissues and organs, and demonstrate vesicoureteral reflux. › Continue Reading

Obesity is a major public health problem, and obesity among children is becoming increasingly common. Obesity can impact multiple body organs and systems and is associated with other diseases such as diabetes. One of the organs that is particularly impacted › Continue Reading

Have you ever wondered why it’s so dark in an ultrasound scan room? Many patients question why we turn the lights down when they come in for a scan. The answer is simple: so we can see better! The retina › Continue Reading

When a girl is born with an anorectal malformation, she can sometimes have anomalies of her vagina, uterus, ovaries, kidneys or bladder. We’ll be focusing on vaginal anomalies, including imperforate hymen, partial agenesis of the vagina and complete agenesis of the › Continue Reading

Cincinnati Children’s is the only hospital in the United States to have a magnetic resonance (MR) unit in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We feel this was important since babies are fragile, have trouble maintaining normal temperature, and do not handle › Continue Reading

Featured Image: Large amount of echogenic debris within the urinary bladder compatible with history of urinary tract infection. Urinary tract infections are a common problem in children. According to the American Urological Association, pediatric urinary tract infections account for more › Continue Reading

In the Radiology Department at Cincinnati Children’s, several of our divisions have been celebrating the season in their own special ways. Our Radiogrpahy/Fluoroscophy division decorated a tall holiday tree and other holiday ornaments in their Quality Control (QC) area. The Ultrasound division decorated › Continue Reading

Even though the nuclear medicine community is unfamiliar to many people outside of the medical field, it is a commonly used modality to image virtually every part of the body. There are many interesting facts about this field. I’m going › Continue Reading

Last week it was the Radiography/Fluoroscophy technologists and staff that took up the “Mannequin Challenge.” We continue this challenge series with the technologists in our Ultrasound Division here at Cincinnati Children’s. Related Article: Radiography and Fluoroscopy Takes Up the Challenge Sit › Continue Reading

Radiation exposure from medical tests is a hot topic in the news. While all of us are exposed to small amounts of radiation daily from sources such as the sun, the food we eat, and the buildings we live in, › Continue Reading

Here at Cincinnati Children’s, our Radiology Department images about 120 chest x-rays a day. That’s a lot compared to our other modalities like CT, MRI, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, etc. It is also one of the least time-consuming exams. Our radiography technologists are › Continue Reading

Stroke is a serious complication in patients with sickle cell disease. Here in the Cincinnati Children’s Radiology Department, we perform transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound exams to check for increased risk of stroke in these patients. The TCD exam is similar › Continue Reading

Your child’s first experience with ultrasound probably occurred before they were even born! Most pregnancies today have at least one ultrasound to monitor fetal health. Ultrasound is the type of imaging used most often in pregnant women and in children › Continue Reading

Image: Ultrasound obtained behind the knee of a young child with a soft bump shows a round cyst (white arrow) with a “tail” (yellow arrow) extending deep toward the joint between the muscles. This is a typical appearance and location for › Continue Reading

Image: Ultrasound image of intussusception. Red arrow: inside bowel loop (intussusseptum). Blue arrow: outside bowel loop, the wall is thickened from edema (intussussipiens). Image contributed by Dr. Aaron McAllister. Intussusception is a condition in which one part of the bowel telescopes into the › Continue Reading