A Review of Medication Manager Apps

Research has shown that about half of all families of kids who take daily medication have a hard time remembering to take their medication at least some of the time.

Medication adherence, or the extent to which patients’ behaviors match the recommendations from their doctor, is incredibly important.

Kids and teens can have significant consequences from not using their medications as prescribed. These problems can include not feeling well, poor symptom control and activity limitations.

Taking their medication as their doctor prescribed is the best way for kids to feel their best, control their symptoms and ensure that they can participate in the activities they enjoy.

We have found that many of our patients want to take their medications on schedule, but wind up forgetting or becoming distracted by something else.

For some families, medication apps can help them establish a routine of taking medication at the same time each day. For others, the app acts as a reminder every once in a while when the family has a really busy day and may have forgotten otherwise.

And the bonus is that it can help adolescents and teens to learn to take charge of their own health care plan.

Because medication tracker apps can be incredibly useful, we reviewed the following apps to help you find one that works for your family, based on your needs:

Possible FeaturesMyMedSchedule MobileMango Health Medication ManagerMedCoach Medication ReminderMediSafe Meds & Pill Reminder
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Alerts you to take medsXXX
Prescription refill remindersX
Connect w/ pharmacy to refill prescriptionsXX
Track progressXX
Create medication schedulesXX
Create list of medications for doctorXX
Synchronizes with other family membersX
Drug interaction warningsX
Gives points and rewardsX
FREEXXXX

To learn more about the Center for Adherence and Self-Management, visit our webpage or call 513-636-4336

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Rachelle Ramsey, PhD

About the Author: Rachelle Ramsey, PhD

Rachelle Ramsey, PhD, is a pediatric psychologist in the Center for Health Technology Research and the Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology at Cincinnati Children's. She works mostly with children and teenagers with asthma, but has experience with children with other chronic illnesses during her fellowship in the Center for Treatment Adherence and Self-Management. She enjoys going to the park with her family and pumpkin-flavored everything.

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