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Is eating healthier one of your family’s New Year’s resolutions? Making meals at home is a great way to achieve that goal. However, more cooking at your house means that you’ll have to make more trips to the grocery store—and › Continue Reading

2018 was an amazing year at Cincinnati Children’s! From groundbreaking research, to memorable moments and amazing people, it was certainly a year to remember. Here are the top 10 stories from 2018 shown in alphabetical order: Advances in Organoid Medicine This year › Continue Reading

Working at the Drug and Poison Information Center (DPIC), I answer questions from callers about accidental exposures to harmful substances. Particularly around the holidays, we’ll receive an uptick in calls about accidental alcohol ingestion in kids.  Alcohol is potentially toxic to children, and › Continue Reading

Since he was an infant, few things have brought 5-year-old Ephraim Lober more joy than music. He attended his first baby music class at just 6 weeks old and was totally enthralled. He quickly became the poster child for music therapy › Continue Reading

It’s the time of year when playing outside means playing in the snow for kids in much of the country. Whether it’s skiing, snowboarding, or sledding, there are several things you can do to ensure your child stays safe and › Continue Reading

The legal answer to this question comes from the state in which you live. For the State of Ohio, booster seat law states a child should remain in a booster seat until they reach 8 years old or 4’9” tall, › Continue Reading

As a new parent, it can be overwhelming sorting through all of the advice you receive. The one you’ve probably heard the most is to put your baby on his back to sleep, to help prevent sudden infant death syndrome › Continue Reading

The holidays mean something a little bit different for everyone. For me, it’s the time of year in which I step up my button battery awareness efforts into high gear. My youngest son, Emmett, swallowed a button battery eight years › Continue Reading

I’ve always admired my daughter’s determination.  Whatever Attie is doing, she gives 110%. This passion spills over into her dance performances, academics, and even her battle with pancreatitis. So I shouldn’t be surprised that she is dancing the lead in › Continue Reading

Receiving a diagnosis of twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) can be overwhelming. The mother faces the possibility of fetal surgery and modified bed rest afterward. Her unborn babies’ lives are typically in serious danger. At this time, families usually are experiencing › Continue Reading

You don’t have to avoid vacationing just because your child has Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis.  To help families prepare, our IBD team put this checklist together to help families when traveling abroad or here in the US. Maintaining your child’s › Continue Reading

Having a child diagnosed with a chronic illness is anxiety provoking for any family. This is especially true when a child is diagnosed with epilepsy, which is an unpredictable and potentially life-threatening disease. While most children do well and stop › Continue Reading

Research. Clinical trials. To say that I’m passionate about these is an understatement. That’s because It became apparent to me in my early years in medicine that the way to make the biggest impact for patients was to conduct research › Continue Reading

Thankful doesn’t begin to describe how I feel as I reflect upon the last few months. I am thankful that my son, Anthony, is exactly where he is right now. Thankful that his injury wasn’t worse that it was. And › Continue Reading

Preparing Thanksgiving dinner can be stressful under the best of circumstances! But when you have a guest with food allergies, menu planning can be even more of a challenge. Read on for a few recipes and tips for hosting a › Continue Reading

If you’re pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant, you’re probably aware of how common premature birth is. Every year in the United States, 380,000 babies are born prematurely, or when a baby is born before 37 weeks of gestation. This › Continue Reading

I always knew my son, Ethan, would need surgery. It’s pretty common for kids with cerebral palsy to need orthopedic surgery at some point in their lives. He has mild to moderate cerebral palsy and we tried to avoid surgery › Continue Reading

As an adult with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) and mother of three children—one of whom also has T1D—I have learned that this chronic illness can easily present mental and emotional challenges. My experience, however, has also taught me that parents › Continue Reading

Dance is hard on the body. Long hours of practice mean a dancer’s muscles are aching nearly every time they take the floor due to muscle fatigue. We consider that muscle fatigue to be a “good” pain because it will › Continue Reading

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a bacterial infection that occurs along the normally sterile urinary tract (kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra) and is common in children. It’s important to remember some main points about UTIs, because if your child › Continue Reading

Reports of children who’ve contracted acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) have been in the news lately. Because of this, parents may be wondering what AFM is and how they can keep their family safe. While the condition is serious, the good › Continue Reading

If you’ve been to Burnet Campus lately, you have probably noticed major changes happening! The most apparent modifications are the expansive Critical Care Building project and renovation of clinical space. The one we’d like to make you aware of today › Continue Reading

The rate of sleep-related infant deaths has declined more than 50 percent since the 1994 Back-to-Sleep campaign was launched, encouraging parents to place infants to sleep on their backs. Unfortunately, sleep-related infant deaths still claim 3,500 lives in the United › Continue Reading

As a new mother, you want everything for your baby to be the absolute best from the get-go. I had no idea when my son Cillian was born that anything was wrong with his head. My husband Hector and I › Continue Reading

Adults who were born with congenital heart disease (CHD) need to be followed by a cardiologist with specific training on the condition. Adults with CHD typically fall into two categories: those who have been seen all along, and those who › Continue Reading