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It’s pool time again! This time of year is always exciting for kids who are eager to spend time in the water, but it’s also an important time to review pool safety rules for the entire family. Drowning continues to be the second leading › Continue Reading

My son, Tyler, has always been independent and confident. So much so, that our family joked that we could put him on a plane by himself to China at the age of four and he would have managed just fine. › Continue Reading

Acne is a very frequent problem in adolescence. Up to 85% of teens and young adults will develop it at some point in their lives. Even though it is so common, many teens still struggle with the personal and social › Continue Reading

The role of strength training in youth sports has long been a point of contention among parents, coaches and even doctors. Much of that has to do with a lack of understanding and myths about the subject. You might be › Continue Reading

I think most parents would agree that talking about sex and sexting with your child – regardless of the age – can be awkward. It may be tempting to put off the conversation as long as possible. However, it’s important › Continue Reading

There is nothing better than opening the windows after a long, cold winter and feeling the warm, spring breeze flow through your house. But it is also the time of year that I like to remind families about how dangerous › Continue Reading

There is certainly no shortage of dieting, health, and nutrition advice out there today.  Making sense of it all can be challenging.  As a parent, when you decide you want to start adopting a healthier diet for your kids, where › Continue Reading

Catesby is our 14-year-old son who literally lives for sports. It is his identity. As a child who successfully deals with dyslexia, his main outlet is sports, the number one sport being soccer. Catesby plays on a highly competitive select travel › Continue Reading

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an often misunderstood condition. Obsessions, as I like to explain to my younger patients, are thoughts that they can’t get out of their heads. Compulsions are the behaviors that they feel like they have to do. › Continue Reading

My son, Andy, is in seventh grade. He has blond hair, blue eyes and plays baseball. He also happens to stutter. While Andy has been in speech therapy for most of his life for varying reasons, he started working with › Continue Reading

The first year of a baby’s life is full of exciting milestones and parenting challenges. A baby’s first solid food experience is often a little of both! When I’m talking to new parents about their baby’s nutrition and particularly the › Continue Reading

Cancer in everyone – from infants to the elderly – is complicated. However, cancer in adolescents and young adults (AYA) presents a particularly unique set of challenges. This group, defined as 15-39 year olds, accounts for about five percent of › Continue Reading

In the middle of May 2014, out of nowhere, my son, Will, had a seizure. Little did we know that it wouldn’t be his last, nor how much our lives were about to change.  Soon after, our pediatrician sent us › Continue Reading

Staying current on teenage trends is a fleeting task – as soon as we learn about one, they’re onto something else. However, there is one trend that I want to flag for parents if you haven’t heard about it already: › Continue Reading

Recently, I joined some colleagues from Denmark and the US to publish a study. It found a higher risk of dementia in adults who were born with congenital heart disease (CHD). In particular, we discovered a significantly higher risk for › Continue Reading

Let’s take a look inside those ears. How many times have you heard that when you take your kids to the doctor?  It’s a routine part of an exam and the key to determining if a patient has an ear › Continue Reading

Kidney stones are not just an adult problem. In fact, the number of children with kidney stones has increased four-fold in the last 15 years. What’s more, if your child gets one kidney stone, he’s 50% more likely to get › Continue Reading

You’ve likely heard it from your doctor time and again: Antibiotics won’t work against a viral illness. But why not? That’s a good question, and the answer starts with the differences between viruses and bacteria.   Virus Versus Bacteria As › Continue Reading

What does a healthy body look like? There is no straightforward answer. The media often tells us that an ideal, healthy body is thin and muscular. However, a healthy body varies extremely in both size and shape.  For example, a › Continue Reading

2017 brought breakthrough research, plans for expansion and an unforgettable baby hippo to the lives of our patients and staff. Take a look back at some of the cool things that happened in 2017, listed in chronological order. Cincinnati Children’s › Continue Reading

If you have been to Burnet Campus lately you have probably noticed the exciting changes that happened in our main concourse over the past year or so. Crews have been hard at work making these areas bright, colorful, welcoming and › Continue Reading

Dear Heart Donor Family: That name seems so cold considering the role you now play in our lives. You saved our son’s life. We’ve thought about you a thousand times. We’ve wondered how you are coping. We know you miss › Continue Reading

Twenty years ago my son was born with a heart condition called tetralogy of Fallot. When I found out I was shocked and had a million questions fluttering through my mind. Gabe has a congenital heart defect? Something is wrong › Continue Reading

I was born with pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect and multiple aortopulmonary collateral arteries. To put it simple, I was born with a hole in the bottom half of my heart, no pulmonary valve, and lots of tiny arteries › Continue Reading

Now’s the time when families start considering and booking vacations for the summer. But for the parents of children with special needs, thinking about a vacation takes a whole other level of consideration and forethought. Many families want to go › Continue Reading