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That’s my 10-year-old son, Parker, in the photo above. He’s riding a bike. That might sound like a fairly typical activity for a kid his age. But for him, it’s miraculous. I can’t watch it without getting choked up. It’s a › Continue Reading

Today is a day of celebration – our ranking has climbed to #2 on U.S. News and World Report’s 2018-2019 Best Children’s Hospitals ranking! Additionally, our specialty care has achieved the Top 10 in all 10 ranked specialties distinction – › Continue Reading

As a nurse practitioner in Cincinnati Children’s NICU, I meet parents on their happiest and most challenging of days. They’ve just welcomed a new baby into their family, but things aren’t going the way they’d hoped. It’s my job to › Continue Reading

Three years ago we received a call about a three-month-old boy, Sawyer, and his three-year-old brother, Gavin. We were told that there was something wrong with the baby’s liver and were asked if we were willing to take them. At › Continue Reading

When I was nine years old, my mom enrolled me in my first recreational dance class. She thought it would be a temporary hobby. One recreational class turned into nine years of competitive dancing, including countless out-of-town competitions and conventions. › Continue Reading

When my son Kelly was younger, he spent a lot of time with my sister and her family, especially in the summer months. He looked up to his Uncle Allen and cousins and always wanted to do what they did. › Continue Reading

It’s a question I am asked frequently as a colorectal surgeon. When parents first learn of their newborn’s anorectal malformation, or imperforate anus, they have many questions and concerns. Like all new parents, they want the very best start for › Continue Reading

Has your child been diagnosed with a conversion disorder, functional gastrointestinal or neurological disorder, chronic pain, or syncope? All of these diagnoses have something in common: somatic symptoms. Somatic symptoms are caused by disruptions in how the brain and the › Continue Reading

As the weather is finally getting warmer, your kids are probably itching to get outside to play. We know that kids are going to fall, crash, slip and tumble, but there are important things parents can do to ensure that › Continue Reading

Achoo! It’s the time of year when seasonal allergies peak. But in reality, allergic symptoms can happen year round. That’s because there’s just as many indoor allergens as there are outdoor. And for kids with asthma and allergies, this can › Continue Reading

A few weeks ago, we released research findings that described a connection between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and seven well-known diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and type 1 diabetes.  The › Continue Reading

Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) is an illness that is both common and treatable. It can also be scary for parents because it usually affects young children and often starts with a high fever and rash. It could also › Continue Reading

If you have apraxia of speech, I want you to know that you are not alone. You see, I have it too, which means that we’ve probably faced similar challenges in life. Because we have a hard time putting sounds › Continue Reading

It’s pool time again! This time of year is always exciting for kids who are eager to spend time in the water, but it’s also an important time to review pool safety rules for the entire family. Drowning continues to be the second leading › Continue Reading

My son, Tyler, has always been independent and confident. So much so, that our family joked that we could put him on a plane by himself to China at the age of four and he would have managed just fine. › Continue Reading

Acne is a very frequent problem in adolescence. Up to 85% of teens and young adults will develop it at some point in their lives. Even though it is so common, many teens still struggle with the personal and social › Continue Reading

The role of strength training in youth sports has long been a point of contention among parents, coaches and even doctors. Much of that has to do with a lack of understanding and myths about the subject. You might be › Continue Reading

I think most parents would agree that talking about sex and sexting with your child – regardless of the age – can be awkward. It may be tempting to put off the conversation as long as possible. However, it’s important › Continue Reading

There is nothing better than opening the windows after a long, cold winter and feeling the warm, spring breeze flow through your house. But it is also the time of year that I like to remind families about how dangerous › Continue Reading

There is certainly no shortage of dieting, health, and nutrition advice out there today.  Making sense of it all can be challenging.  As a parent, when you decide you want to start adopting a healthier diet for your kids, where › Continue Reading

Catesby is our 14-year-old son who literally lives for sports. It is his identity. As a child who successfully deals with dyslexia, his main outlet is sports, the number one sport being soccer. Catesby plays on a highly competitive select travel › Continue Reading

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an often misunderstood condition. Obsessions, as I like to explain to my younger patients, are thoughts that they can’t get out of their heads. Compulsions are the behaviors that they feel like they have to do. › Continue Reading

My son, Andy, is in seventh grade. He has blond hair, blue eyes and plays baseball. He also happens to stutter. While Andy has been in speech therapy for most of his life for varying reasons, he started working with › Continue Reading

The first year of a baby’s life is full of exciting milestones and parenting challenges. A baby’s first solid food experience is often a little of both! When I’m talking to new parents about their baby’s nutrition and particularly the › Continue Reading

Cancer in everyone – from infants to the elderly – is complicated. However, cancer in adolescents and young adults (AYA) presents a particularly unique set of challenges. This group, defined as 15-39 year olds, accounts for about five percent of › Continue Reading