Tag "NICU"

If you’re pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant, you’re probably aware of how common premature birth is. Every year in the United States, 380,000 babies are born prematurely, or when a baby is born before 37 weeks of gestation. This › Continue Reading

As a nurse practitioner in Cincinnati Children’s NICU, I meet parents on their happiest and most challenging of days. They’ve just welcomed a new baby into their family, but things aren’t going the way they’d hoped. It’s my job to › Continue Reading

On Christmas day of 2011, I was flat on my back in a stretcher within the maternity ward recovering from an emergency c-section. My first-born child, Ashlin, was only a few hundred feet away from me in the neonatal intensive › Continue Reading

The littlest patients at Cincinnati Children’s received a special gift from the Cincinnati Zoo on Friday. Babies in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) received onesies featuring a picture of baby hippo Fiona, who was born premature at the Zoo › Continue Reading

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an imaging method that uses the protons of hydrogen atoms within the body to generate a medical image. MRI of the lungs has historically been challenging for a few different reasons. One reason is that › Continue Reading

Prematurely born babies often have difficulty breathing on their own because their lungs have not fully developed before birth. Some of these babies require long durations of oxygen support or mechanical ventilation and are given a clinical diagnosis of bronchopulmonary › Continue Reading

Cincinnati Children’s is the only hospital in the United States to have a magnetic resonance (MR) unit in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We feel this was important since babies are fragile, have trouble maintaining normal temperature, and do not handle › Continue Reading

Recently, a baby hippo named Fiona was born six weeks early at the Cincinnati Zoo and Bontanical Gardens.  The Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) staff at Cincinnati Children’s thought it would be a nice gesture to put together a care package › Continue Reading

About 1 in 10 babies are born premature, defined as being born before 37 weeks, each year in the United States. And, in most cases, the cause of prematurity is unknown. My oldest daughter was born nearly three months too early, and › Continue Reading

Students at Miami University developed a video game to help train staff members at Cincinnati Children’s for an emergency evacuation. The game simulates a fire in the NICU and users must choose the best exit and which medications to take › Continue Reading

When we take an x-ray, we use radiation to generate a picture. While radiation is around us each day, it is important to limit exposure when possible. Lead has the unique ability to stop the penetration and scatter of the › Continue Reading

Below, you will find eight videos that were created in 2015 that you should’t miss. These stories did not find their way onto our blog or other social media channels in the last year, so we wanted to be sure to give › Continue Reading

Dr. Jason Woods’ research focuses on novel ways of imaging lung structure and function with techniques that don’t require sedation, anesthesia, or radiation. The two most promising techniques both use MRI—a modality that uses radio frequencies that are lower in energy › Continue Reading

When walkers register for Cincinnati Walks for Kids each year, they become a part of the medical center. The funds raised by walkers can be designated to a specific part of the hospital, or can be directed to the greatest › Continue Reading

In Memory of Liam

The story of our son Liam’s life is the story no parent wants to tell, but we do and we tell it for a reason. We can never have Liam back, but his memory is helping us make something good › Continue Reading

We have come such a long way using ultrasound imaging to visualize internal organs of the body. As I interview some of the Cincinnati Children’s pioneers who were involved in the beginning stages of ultrasound imaging, I realize I am › Continue Reading

At Cincinnati Children’s Radiology, we strive to provide not only safe and high-quality MRI examinations but also timely examinations. We know that our patients’ and families’ time is precious and so we strive to make our MRI examination process as › Continue Reading

No one really wants to go to the doctor. But sometimes, when you get to pretend you’re Peter Pan in physical therapy or make your own super balls with hearing aid mold material at the audiologist, exceptions can be made. › Continue Reading

Gastroschisis is a birth defect of the abdominal (belly) wall where the baby’s intestines stick outside of the body through a hole near the belly button. The cause of this condition is unknown, although it affects approximately 1,871 babies born › Continue Reading

The babies in our neonatal unit are very delicate and require special care. Many are extra small in size due to prematurity, while others are sick and frail due to an underlying illness. These babies often receive important medications through intravenous › Continue Reading

How we learned that our special needs child was becoming more “normal” and how we dealt with the idea of becoming different parents. Sometimes, life gives you lemons. You learn how to make lemonade and in the beginning, the lemonade › Continue Reading

Whether it was his intent or not, Benjamin Scot did an amazing thing for prematurity awareness month when he began capturing footage of his premature infant son just days after his birth. You may have seen Benjamin’s video – “Ward › Continue Reading

This month we are sharing reader-submitted stories that reveal the true spirit of the holiday season. This is Erin’s story of understanding and friendship when it’s needed most. My name is Erin Moore and I am the mother of 4 › Continue Reading

Last we met the Vaughn family, they told a story of a fragile Christmas baby who was fighting for his life. When Lisa and Anthony Vaughn’s son was born on Christmas Day, 2008, they named him Immanuel. He weighed 1 › Continue Reading