blog

2018 was an amazing year at Cincinnati Children’s! From groundbreaking research, to memorable moments and amazing people, it was certainly a year to remember. Here are the top 10 stories from 2018 shown in alphabetical order: Advances in Organoid Medicine This year › Continue Reading

When you learn that your child may need a bone marrow transplant (BMT), you will naturally have a lot of questions. We encourage you to ask as many as you need to, as having a thorough discussion may help you › Continue Reading

Coverage of vaping-related illnesses is all over the news – and with good reason. E-cigarettes have been utilized for a while, yet suddenly there has been a dramatic uptick in acute lung injuries. The common thread between these illnesses is › Continue Reading

Stuttering is not an uncommon occurrence in preschoolers. In fact, some researchers suggest that stuttering may occur during development in 5-11% of kids between the ages of 2.5 and 5 years old. We outlined some examples of stuttering in a › Continue Reading

Teen transitions can be hard. And let’s face it, there are a lot of them. Making the move to the world of adult healthcare is just one of the many transitions that teens must manage. Changing from pediatric to adult › Continue Reading

Whether your child has just had her first seizure or several, they are scary to watch and can seem catastrophic. Seizures are caused by electrical changes in the brain and the resulting symptoms can vary widely from person to person › Continue Reading

The number of teens using e-cigarettes is staggering. According to the NIH, 9.5% of 8th graders, 14% of 10th graders and 16% of 12th graders used them in the prior month of their reporting. What’s more, the Journal of the › Continue Reading

Each season has its own set of respiratory illnesses that can be problematic for kids — and especially for those with asthma. Typical peaks of asthma exacerbations happen in the fall, around when kids go back to school, and spring, › Continue Reading

If your kids are like mine, they’ve been counting down the days until Halloween since October 1. It’s an exciting holiday – playing dress-up, running around the neighborhood, and consuming all of those sugary treats! While it is a fun › Continue Reading

Families of kids with pancreatitis are hungry for information and strategies to help them manage their condition and feel better. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas that can cause significant pain, swelling, infection, or permanent damage to the organ. This › Continue Reading

While social media was meant to bring people together in a positive way, we’re all well aware of the potential abuses, such as cyberbullying. One of the main reasons that social media is ripe for abuse is because many apps › Continue Reading

Children can encounter stress at any phase in their lives. However, kids with chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disorders have additional stressors on top of the ordinary pressures of childhood. They have many more doctors’ visits, medical procedures, injections, and exams. And › Continue Reading

That’s my Jack on the left.  His blonde hair says he has the best attendance of all members at our local swim club.  The backpack says he’s ready for the first day of school.  His crooked smile is silliness.  The › Continue Reading

In simple terms, post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, is a psychiatric condition that develops after a traumatic event and can involve intense, disturbing thoughts, as well as changes in mood and behavior that interfere with day-to-day functioning.  When we think › Continue Reading

If you have a child with ADHD, she likely experiences strong emotional outbursts as well. This is because kids with ADHD are more prone to be emotionally impulsive, which means they are more easily frustrated, impatient, excited, angry and annoyed › Continue Reading

The benefits of eating family meals together are well documented – better grades, healthier eating habits, and stronger parent-child relationships. We envision that our meals will be happy, social times with our families. But the reality is often very different. › Continue Reading

The American Justice Department statistics show that 1 in every 4 kids will be bullied some time in their adolescence. With the consequences of bullying well-documented, this is a sobering statistic. On the flip side, it can be equally disheartening › Continue Reading

September is National Sickle Cell Awareness Month. In the United States, there are approximately 100,000 individuals living with sickle cell disease and millions of people worldwide. Our team of sickle cell experts treats nearly 300 children – providing care from › Continue Reading

Somewhere along the way, snacks immediately following youth athletic events got complicated – not to mention unhealthy! What used to be orange slices and water has turned into the complex coordination of salty and sugar-laden treats and drinks. As a › Continue Reading

The prevalence of kids who are overweight or obese is growing at an alarming rate. In fact, 39.6% of kids between the ages of 2-19 are overweight and 18.5% are obese. What’s even more concerning is that these statistics seem › Continue Reading

As a clinician who has completed psychiatric assessments in the Emergency Department and now teaches suicide prevention, I believe knowing the warning signs of suicide can be helpful for parents in addressing the needs of their child. These warning signs › Continue Reading

Studies suggest that the majority of people who die by suicide give warning signs beforehand, but the signs are not always obvious.  We all – as parents, friends, family and community members – need to be looking for the warning › Continue Reading

As a dietitian in the Center for Better Health and Nutrition, parents often tell me that they spend a lot of time packing their kids’ lunches, only to find the majority of it coming back home. This situation can be › Continue Reading

When Roman was diagnosed with neuroblastoma at 18 months old, we were solely focused on his survival. Receiving a diagnosis like this felt like a typhoon and a tornado hitting us at the same time. Complete devastation and total helplessness. › Continue Reading

To the grandparents of kids with complex medical conditions, and especially my kids’ grandparents: I salute you. I salute you, because there are not enough words or a combination of words to express how much we appreciate you.  I salute › Continue Reading

It’s that time of year again – kids are heading back to school and carting their many supplies to and fro. When used correctly, backpacks are the safest and most efficient way to carry something heavy and distribute the weight › Continue Reading